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‘Should I stay or should I go?’

28 Oct

The Stats

The Office for National Statistics reported that 382,000 people resigned from their jobs in 2011. This figure has been falling ever since the late 1990’s. Recent trends suggest that workers are still affected by the recession – a stagnating job market means that a change in career is not exactly easy. Others see opportunity but are fearful to make the move; the concept of ‘First in, last out’ in relation to redundancy practice is still often used, despite increasing difficulties for the employer in justifying this approach.

Is The Grass Greener?

Nevertheless, many employees consider a job change or career move – motivated these days by the notion of that the ‘grass is greener on the other side’. Therefore, the employee with itchy feet needs to carefully consider certain factors when contemplating a resignation. The decision to resign may come following a bad day or week at work, and therefore be made in the heat of the moment. Employees feeling the pinch are recommended to take a day or two to consider how they really feel.

Consider The Wider Implications

When it comes to career decisions, there is no shame in acting with a little selfishness; after all, a career is a personal thing. Having said that, employees considering a career change or resignation should take some time to carefully and dispassionately consider who would be affected by their actions. In many cases this will be family and friends; these people are likely to be seriously affected by a career change – both in financial and social terms. For some, these will be a stronger influencing factor than for others.
Workers should consider their colleagues and managers too. Specifically, this would be in taking a step back and looking at where one’s current job is going – rather than where it is at the moment. For example, if the reason for leaving is a personality conflict with co-workers or a boss; is the other party looking to leave as well? If so, is it better for the worker to stay put if other aspects of the job are fine? This works the other way round too; a real superstar of a manager may be able to work some magic to make an otherwise stressful working environment a little more bearable.

Other Reasons

The other reason to step back and reflect before reacting is to consider what to do next; more and more people are choosing to explore totally new career paths (recessions seem to compel people to take stock of their priorities). Taking time to consider options will ensure that there is a plan – method behind motivation.
Despite the gloominess of the current job market, people are still making the brave choice to move on to new things. Taking time to reflect on the above will ensure that if someone’s ultimate decision is still to leave, then that choice is communicated with reason and diplomacy in the resignation letter. After all, it’s vital to never burn bridges; who knows what – or who – the future holds.

This post was written with the collaboration with Badenoch and Clark, helping you find the job you are looking for.

 

 

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