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3 Ways to Improve Business Creativity

Anybody who says that only certain people are creative is wrong. Everybody is creative in their own way and just because someone’s creativity may not be as obvious as someone else’s, it should still be encouraged in a similar way. Creativity is important in many different areas of your life; it can keep a relationship fresh and exciting, it can help with hobbies and interests and it can definitely help in the business world.

Most employers would rank creativity very highly on a list of attributes that their potential employees should have and nearly all business owners would like to say that there work force is full of creative ideas. However, this is not often the case as employees can feel reluctant to express themselves creatively at work for many different reasons.

Now more than ever, business need to find new ways of developing and growing as a company and creative employees are sure to help with this. Here are a few ways you can increase the creativity, and therefore the productivity in your work place.

Encourage Interaction

A lot of business owners and managers will set their work environment up in a way which, in their own view, will get the most out of their employees and therefore promote productivity. However, the thought process behind this can often be misled. Arranging the desks in an office so that nobody is facing each other or separating each individual into their own cubicle may not be the best way to promote good work; especially when thinking about creativity.

Creativity works on a basis by which an idea is conceived and then developed by a process of discussion and manipulation. This cannot happen if your workforce is not encouraged to interact with one another. As long as the conversation remains focussed; ideas will be allowed to develop and flourish in a productive environment.

Have Regular Meetings

It may sound strange to anybody working in a small company but people working in many of the larger corporations are likely to never have met most of the other people that work within the business. Whether it’s just between all the people in a single department or whether it involves many different areas of your company, getting your workforce together for regular meetings can really improve creativity in the work place.

They will be able to find out how things work in different areas of the business and in different branches which in turn may give them some ideas for the area in which they work. It will also give everybody an opportunity to discuss any ideas or concepts that they might have with like-minded people and people that are well informed to be able to give them feedback.

You could even take your employees on regular courses that help to improve their creativity. Creativity can be learned and developed in someone, even if they don’t regard themselves to be a creative person. These courses will help to improve creative thinking and brainstorm facilitation.

Have an ‘Open Door’ Policy

Although this may sound like something you might hear a cheesy boss say in a movie or a sitcom, having an open door for your employees is a great way to encourage the creativity inside them to thrive. If they feel like they cannot approach their manager with any ideas they have, that idea may never have the chance to develop.

If you encourage your workforce to come to you with any ideas or potential advancements they may have for the business then you may be surprised with the results. No idea is bad and even if you don’t like the things that your employees are thinking up, just knowing that they can speak to you about any thought they might have will encourage them to be more creative in the work they do.

This article is written by Chris Mayhew on behalf of Now Go Create. Visit their website today to see how their creativity training can improve brainstorm facilitation and creative thinking for your business.

 

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How To Write A Happy Ending

By: Joe Thomas 

I can’t even fathom the number of conversations I’ve had with new clients suffering from a severe case of “I Just Don’t Get It!” disease. The stories of why they wrote their books or developed their products are all different, but the endings are the same: They’re not selling diddly. Squat. Nada.

Before we get too far into the whys and why nots, let me warn you, I am not going to tell you what you want to hear. There’s no magic form for you to fill out to get instant access to my “Special Report,” nor is there a download of secret “For Your Eyes Only” information designed to get you on my mailing list. (My next rant is going to be about buying into the web marketing trap.)

Instead, I’ll go straight to the “why,” which is as complicated as it is simple: People can’t buy what they can’t find.

Most web marketing gurus will tell you that Search Engine Optimization can help direct potential customers to your book or product, and why you should hire them to get you listed front and center. I am not that guy. Oh, I believe in the power of Google, but there are major caveats:

1. Search engines are great if you know what you’re searching for. Type in your name and/or book title into Google and look at the results. You may be at the top of page 1 and even have 22 different listings on the first and second pages. You may get the same results on Bing and other search portals. You might even show up first on Amazon.com, where your book is right there, for sale to the masses. But you’re still not selling many books are you? Here’s the tricky part: YOU know your name and your book title, don’t you? But, people can’t search out your name and book title if they don’t know them.

2. People can search for my incredibly, fantastical keywords, can’t they? Well sure they can – and they do. Let’s assume for a second you have a book and it’s about Politics, Money, Religion, Employment or any number of topics. Now go to Amazon and type in your keywords – you know, Politics, Money, Religion, Employment … You just discovered there are 672,481 books using your Incredibly Fantastical Keywords, right? Now type in those same keywords along with your name and/or book title. Eureka! There you are. I now direct your attention to No. 1 above.

3. Your website is totally gorgeous but it’s not getting you sales. The first part of this quandary is, LOOK AT No. 1, above. Are people actually visiting your site? Have you checked out your server logs to see what your traffic data looks like? You’re probably thinking your webmaster takes care of all that, right? Unless your webmaster is getting a piece of the profits from every item you sell, odds are he/she doesn’t really care. Let’s be honest here, you’re paying your webmaster whether you sell or not. Now, if your traffic data is showing that you’re getting a boatload of traffic but no sales, maybe you need to be more realistic about how gorgeous your site really is. Looking good and converting visitors into buyers are two different things. But before you start blowing up your site, go back and LOOK AT No. 1, ABOVE.

Here’s a bit of free advice: If your marketing plan to reach 100,000 book or product sales is based on people finding you without a clue who you are, keep your day job and forget about buying the fancy car with your profits. You need exposure. You need to get your name and the name of your book, product or business in the news – in newspapers (they all put their content online nowadays), magazines and e-zines and blogs. Get yourself interviewed on talk radio and TV, if you can. Get your social network sites up and active and build a following.

Plenty of people do it themselves. If you find that too difficult or time-consuming, hire professionals to do it for you. There are 5 hundred million thousand books and products for sale online. If you want folks to know what to search for, they have to know that you exist and what you have to offer.

And the happy ending will come.

About Joe Thomas

Joe Thomas is the founder and owner of Left Brain Digital (www.leftbraindigital.com), a web development company. He’s an award-winning web designer/developer with more than 18 years of experience in print and web design and development. Thomas’ work became a major influence in graphic and web design in the “Y2K” era of the Internet‘s dot-com explosion.

 

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