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Does How You Feel about Money Affect Your Wealth?

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Best-Selling Business Author Offers 3 Tips for Changing
Your Attitude 

Although we live in the richest and most advanced society the world has ever known, many of us say we need more money in order to be happy, notes best-selling business book author Doug Vermeeren.

“Even some of those in the top percentile of earners often feel like they don’t have enough money,” says Vermeeren, (www.DouglasVermeeren.com), an international speaker who consults with celebrities, business executives and professional athletes.

“The math is simple: More money does not equal more happiness. It’s our attitude toward money, not the amount, that influences our happiness the most.”

Happiness researchers Elizabeth Dunn and Michael Norton, professors at the Harvard Business School, recently published research indicating that it’s not money that makes people happy, nor the things people buy with it. Rather, it’s the experiences one has that ultimately account for happiness.

“How you experience your money on a day-to-day basis is what matters,” Vermeeren says. “If the software running in your brain is constantly reinforcing the message, ‘it’s not enough,’ then that is likely how you will see yourself and experience your life – as ‘not enough.’ ”

Vermeeren reviews the three fallacies of abundance as it relates to happiness:

• We are all entitled to a certain amount of wealth: The feeling that we deserve or are owed a certain amount of wealth will always make us unhappy with whatever we have. While we are entitled to certain human rights, those do not include a winning lottery ticket. In reality, we are not owed any amount of abundance and, in fact, should count ourselves lucky if we’re able to meet our basic needs; many in the world are not. More of us, however, would be happier simply appreciating what we have.

• The result of our labors is money: Money is a means to an end, not an end in itself. This can be a challenge to keep in mind since so much of our lives are spent in the pursuit of money. We work and go to school to support ourselves and our families. We see things we want, and we know we need more money for them. Study after study shows, however, that what really makes us happy is what we do and who we do it with, and not how much money we spend.

• We’ll be happiest when we finally reach our goal: We are happiest when we are progressing toward a goal. When we lose sight of our goal, veer off the path toward our goal, and even achieve our goal, we’re less happy. Rather than setting one goal and deciding you will be happy when you meet it, you’ll be most happy if you continually set goals and relish your journey toward them.

About Doug Vermeeren

Doug Vermeeren is an internationally renowned public speaker, author, movie producer and director. His life coaching strategies help those from all walks of life, with clients including business executives, celebrities, professional athletes and more. Throughout the last decade, Vermeeren has conducted extensive first hand research into the lives of more than 400 of the world’s top contemporary achievers, making him a sought-after commentator on news outlets including ABC, FOX, CNN and more. He has written three titles contributing to Guerilla Marketing, the best-selling business series in publishing, which is included reading in the Harvard Business School. His documentaries include the award-winning film, The Opus, which has been published by Random House as a book in 23 countries. Vermeeren’s latest film, The Gratitude Experiment , has received critical acclaim.

 

 

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Does How You Feel about Money Affect Your Wealth?

Doug-Vermeeren
Best-Selling Business Author Offers 3 Tips for Changing
Your Attitude 

Although we live in the richest and most advanced society the world has ever known, many of us say we need more money in order to be happy, notes best-selling business book author Doug Vermeeren.

“Even some of those in the top percentile of earners often feel like they don’t have enough money,” says Vermeeren, (www.DouglasVermeeren.com), an international speaker who consults with celebrities, business executives and professional athletes.

“The math is simple: More money does not equal more happiness. It’s our attitude toward money, not the amount, that influences our happiness the most.”

Happiness researchers Elizabeth Dunn and Michael Norton, professors at the Harvard Business School, recently published research indicating that it’s not money that makes people happy, nor the things people buy with it. Rather, it’s the experiences one has that ultimately account for happiness.

“How you experience your money on a day-to-day basis is what matters,” Vermeeren says. “If the software running in your brain is constantly reinforcing the message, ‘it’s not enough,’ then that is likely how you will see yourself and experience your life – as ‘not enough.’ ”

Vermeeren reviews the three fallacies of abundance as it relates to happiness:

• We are all entitled to a certain amount of wealth: The feeling that we deserve or are owed a certain amount of wealth will always make us unhappy with whatever we have. While we are entitled to certain human rights, those do not include a winning lottery ticket. In reality, we are not owed any amount of abundance and, in fact, should count ourselves lucky if we’re able to meet our basic needs; many in the world are not. More of us, however, would be happier simply appreciating what we have.

• The result of our labors is money: Money is a means to an end, not an end in itself. This can be a challenge to keep in mind since so much of our lives are spent in the pursuit of money. We work and go to school to support ourselves and our families. We see things we want, and we know we need more money for them. Study after study shows, however, that what really makes us happy is what we do and who we do it with, and not how much money we spend.

• We’ll be happiest when we finally reach our goal: We are happiest when we are progressing toward a goal. When we lose sight of our goal, veer off the path toward our goal, and even achieve our goal, we’re less happy. Rather than setting one goal and deciding you will be happy when you meet it, you’ll be most happy if you continually set goals and relish your journey toward them.

About Doug Vermeeren

Doug Vermeeren is an internationally renowned public speaker, author, movie producer and director. His life coaching strategies help those from all walks of life, with clients including business executives, celebrities, professional athletes and more. Throughout the last decade, Vermeeren has conducted extensive first hand research into the lives of more than 400 of the world’s top contemporary achievers, making him a sought-after commentator on news outlets including ABC, FOX, CNN and more. He has written three titles contributing to Guerilla Marketing, the best-selling business series in publishing, which is included reading in the Harvard Business School. His documentaries include the award-winning film, The Opus, which has been published by Random House as a book in 23 countries. Vermeeren’s latest film, The Gratitude Experiment , has received critical acclaim.

 

 

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7 Body Language Tips to Bear in Mind When Negotiating.

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Negative Example: Mr X crooked his wrist and slumped his head sideways, crashing it into the open palm of his right hand.

Positive Example:  Mr X came around from behind his desk walking boldly towards his visitor. The barrier of furniture had been dissolved and Mr X met the gaze of the salesman with a disarming confidence.

Body language can betray or confirm your words. An employee can leave his hopes of a pay rise at the door if during the review he sits slouched with his legs strewn out under his boss’ desk or even in more discreet ways fails to present himself as assertive and capable. Fortunately one can boost their chances with a few tips.

1)     Don’t touch your neck

The neck is a vulnerable area. So don’t touch it. If you are rubbing the back of your neck, lightly pinching your Adam’s apple or doing other inventive neck activity this is likely to lead someone to mistrust you or communicate that obvious fact that you are uncomfortable. You will be unable to strong arm that cockney car salesman as he will jump at the signal his helpless prey has just fired off.

2)     Firm handshake

This is essential. There are few things far worse, excluding flatulence, than a flimsy moist handshake. Bill Clinton claimed he always endeavored to meet the web between the thumb and index finger. This is usually a reliable technique. However a firm handshake is not a vice grip. It is about being expressive not aggressive (not physically at least)

3)     Mr. Mime

Professor Michael Wheeler from Harvard Business School observed that “after two or more people have been in each other’s presence for just a few minutes, their behavior begins to subtly converge…breathing patterns and heart rates sync up, and they also tend to mimic each other’s posture and hand gestures.” Emulation is a sign of flattery. It shows the other party you are at ease and are subconsciously in agreement with them. This is a useful negotiating tool as often it is about aligning your interests with that of another.

4)     Contact

During the presidential debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney both men made use of physical contact. Obama shook hands with Romney and placed his other hand high on Romney’s shoulder. Analysts speculate that this is a gesture of control. It is also one of affection and can melt the corporate armour of the suit jacket. We touch a persons arm to guide them, to show pity, to reassure them. By doing the same in negotiation we tap into all such associations at once.

5)     Fidgeting

To be a good negotiator implies control over a situation. You cannot be in a position of control if you’re twiddling your thumbs, licking your lips whilst impatiently waggling your feet. It will put the other person on edge and scream incompetence. Relax and sit calmly. If you’re going to make any gestures, time them and execute them with conviction.

6)     Posture

If you’re sitting down, sit up and look interested. While you might not need to lunge across the table attacking the space with your elbows it is equally bad to tilt your head back and gaze at the ceiling. If you’re standing, pin those shoulders back to avoid the slouch, pronounce that chest and revert back to a primitive form of masculinity. Just don’t bash on your chest or make any gorilla roars.

7)     Smile

You’re a warm approachable and honest person. Well if you’re not that, at least this should help create that image. One part of business is about transparency, it is simply not desirable to enter any negotiations with a deceitful agent, and people prefer to be assured of credibility. A smile goes a long way here: it tells the other party that you are at ease, unstressed, and personable. In turn they may feel at ease and negotiations can continue untrammeled.

A last note on body language is that all the above can never look too contrived. Body language must be natural otherwise you risk walking around like a creepy robot or unnerving people with mistimed touchy feely gestures.

Featured images:

This article was supplied by Josh Hervall, a keen blogger and negotiation enthusiast. He writes for www.thegappartnership.com, experts in Business Negotiation Training.

 

 

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Tips to Get Out of A Rut at Work

So you have a great job and you love what you do but for some reason the past few days, weeks, or hopefully not, months, you haven’t been finding your feet and biting more than you can chew to compensate for an unproductive day. Sounds like you? Well, recent research conducted by Harvard Business School in January/February 2012  quotes that “happy employees produce more than unhappy ones over the long term” and the key to happiness is more than just being content with your job and loving what you do- it’s about sustainable performance.

So what is exactly is sustainable performance? It’s the process of utilizing high energy (vitality) and new resources (learning) in an efficient way. You can’t have one without the other when it comes to sustainable performance. The Harvard Business School study shows that high energy and low learning resulted in a 54% decrease in health while high levels in both areas resulted in a higher effective rate of 21%. Below are three tips that are essential in being sustainable and productive to get out of a rut at work:

Tip #1: Vitality and The Energy Factor: In order to get out of a rut, you need to decipher the living from the non-living. It’s great to be an expert in your job but doing the same routine to produce good results doesn’t produce great ones or new ideas. Having high energy in the workforce without the burnout is very essential. Try to set new goals for yourself and focus on the parts of your job that gives you joy and make it better. Oh, and lighten up on the coffee breaks and opt-in for a micro-mediation session every once in a while to clear your mind.

Tip #2: The Learning Curve: The world is moving faster today than ever before as technology spearheads and is incorporated into our everyday life. How do you expect to advance your career without learning something new? It’s a never-ending life cycle, even for well-known industry experts. Learning something new allows you to build your resources, enhance your skills, and increases your marketability in this multi-tasking world.

Tip #3: The Work Environment: Everyone talks about teamwork and engagement but it’s another thing to live and breathe it. Make sure you are taking the time to get feedback from fellow teammates as well as give when needed. Our strongest stem is as weak as our weakest stem and encouraging team collaboration is great for any work environment. Be proactive about it if this is missing at your job.

Citations:

This article was written by Yasleen Dates for Institute For Coaching.

 

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Black History Month Celebrates Madam CJ Walker

The mere fact that the world celebrates Black History Month shows everyone how far we’ve come in breaking down racial barriers. The idea is to show everyone how colour and lifestyle barriers were smashed and paved the black community to rightfully play their part and make their mark in the world. There many so many figures who deserve to be highly spoken of but right now we’re going to focus one seriously sassy and determined lady who made life work for her after the abolition of slavery.

Madam CJ Walker

Born in the Louisiana Delta in 1867, Madam CJ Walker – formerly Sarah Breedlove – was born to former slaves. Her introduction to life came two years after the civil war ended. Unfortunately CJ and her were orphaned at the age of 7 and forced to work the cotton fields in order to make ends meet. However, this only served to enforce her determination to overcome adversity. CJ Walker became the first black woman to become a self-made millionaire. Her story is so thrilling and unique that it has been the focus of studies at Harvard Business School. It was not an easy road for her at all but she persevered and has become an icon not only for Black History Month, but in life for everyone regardless of colour.

At the age of 14 CJ met her husband and they had a daughter together. Sadly her spouse passed away shortly after her daughter was born, so CJ moved to St Louis to work for her brothers who owned a successful barber shop. After moving to the city CJ was found to have scalp condition which meant she lost most of her hair. Trying various products she eventually found one made by Anne Malone, another black history month member. The product proved to be exactly with CJ required for her mane and she decided to move to Denver and sell Annie’s products. She moved back to St Louis, married again and started creating her own hair conditioner. Her product proved to be a huge success and she developed plenty of other serums that assisted with problem skins and scalps. She eventually started travelling all over the country giving demonstrations. This seriously brilliant black lady become a huge success and in 1908 she opened a school to train ladies to sell her wares, which now included vegetable shampoos and cosmetics.

Over 100 years down the line Madam CJ Walker still enters our lives every day and many of you don’t even know it. Black History Month is about celebrating and educating. Does “Avon calling” ring a bell for you? Surprised? How is that for an education?

Vida Denning enjoys writing on a wide variety of topics and found that she learned a lot about history when she worked at a serviced office Spain and so much about culture at her time in serviced offices Hong Kong.

 

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