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From a Guitar-Pop Concert to a Thought: America is not just the Business World—Expand!

26 Jul

Indeed, like what Moz has been singing in his concerts these days, America is not the world. Although the song’s lyrics are far from what I want to point out, the crooner successfully sent a more beautiful thought through his rolling r’s, lisped s’s, and whimsical yodels. And as a vigilant spectator of economics and business trends, I never see any bias in his words, but rather I them as apolitical and an eye-opener.

America is not just the world. Maybe the critically acclaimed Brit singer was correct when he wrote these words in his studio; I am not sure about it, but I know where he is coming from—especially when I heard him sing it live in a concert ground surrounded by tall skyscrapers that housed the world’s most renowned financial institutions.

America is not the World, the business side, my point of view

It is only natural for us Americans to focus on our target market as we start our business. We rely on what is available and existing around us. We start from our friends and colleagues and make them our initial customers, then move on to our neighbors, and expand a bit to their relatives and friends. We then get a feel of the whole process and finally settle for a fixed daily promotional routine, which we find as a perfect time to stop and call it a regular business flow. We call this stage contentment, the point of labeling our business as “stable”. But in my own point of view, to be contended this early is a business illness.

Another illness is that we always think there is nothing greener than the pastures of our homeland and ignore all the possibilities outside it—even the neighboring southern regions of Mexico or Canada. The grandeur of our country blinds us from seeing the world outside, as if there is no other county, no other “real” market and financial possibility than America. The truth is, some of us are just too scared to branch out, too apathetic to expand, and unfortunately, too terrified to dream.

Perhaps you will say this thought is only for international companies and big businesses or for those who have the money to finance a wider business campaign. In fact, what is the purpose of aiming for an international promotion if your business is just a 35 sq. meter diner along a working class Long Island Boulevard? Or what is the point of overdoing your social networking ads on Twitter and Facebook if you are just an online businessman who wants an extra income for your weekend hobbies? Is it reasonable to dream that big if you are plainly contended with where you are right now? The answer is simple: expansion, or to dream big, is only for those who have desire to follow and achieve it. Fortunately, as a marketing speaker for ten years, I have sensed and seen scores of Americans who are dreamers, who are not satisfied with their four-cornered rented business areas.

Let us accept it. Some Americans are only business owners and not business-minded. Well, it is not an issue of race or anything; it is just my observation. We think of having a business as a profession, a job, an escape route to joblessness or to our former low-paying profession, but not as a way and part of life.

Fortunately, although some Americans think that way, most do not. I have been hearing countless success stories of Americans who became CEOs regardless of their humble beginnings—from a street sweeper to a remote control car parts manufacturer in Canada, from a typical college student in New Orleans to an Internet Marketing head in India, from a tired hamburger kiosk owner in Des Moines to a major Quesadilla wrapper supplier in Central Mexico. All these success stories may sound surreal and saying that I have met them personally would not make it more believable either. Yet there is one thing that makes these stories similar to each other (and makes them believable as well): they all started online, through Facebook, Twitter, and blogs that others have ignored and used for entertainment and leisure.

The advent of social media sites, especially social networking sites that have simplified the lives of humans, has given Americans a clear path to expand their businesses outside the vicinity of their physical stores. Today, this over-availability of social networking sites is changing the dynamics of local businesses, for a lot of them today have strong followings and customers outside their localities, state, and countries.

And certainly, I am sure that Moz is 100% correct when he sang America is not just the world.

Your author Warner likes to write about technology related topics. He works with Endless Rise who provides SEO Reseller Packages and White Label SEO services exclusively to resellers.

 

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