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Monthly Archives: May 2013

Thank You LinkedIn – NOT part 3

Here is an explanation of the navigation changes that I found.  It might have been really nice of them to actually email us all (especially those of us that were viewed in the top 1%) and let us know before the change went into effect.  I guess that is just not their style.

li headerChanges to the Top Navigation Links on the Homepage

How do I find places that I used to see on my top navigation bar?

Last Reviewed: 05/24/2013

Report Answer Inaccuracies

With the new version of LinkedIn navigation, certain features may have moved or changed. Below is a list of items and how you can find them.

  • Inbox – Click the Inbox icon at the top right of your homepage to access your messages and invitations.
  • The top navigation bar disappears as you scroll down the page – To see it again, move your cursor to the top of the page. You’ll also see it when you scroll in the upward direction, or scroll all the way to the top.
  • Skills and Expertise – Go to http://www.linkedin.com/skills/, or move your cursor over any of the skills listed on a profile and click the title of the skill.
  • Recruiter link – If you have a Recruiter account, you’ll find the Recruiter link by moving your cursor over your profile photo at the top right of your homepage and selecting Go to Recruiter. You can also log into Recruiter via http://www.linkedin.com/recruiter/.
  • LinkedIn Today, Influencer Posts, and Channels – Move your cursor over Interests at the top of your homepage and select Influencers.
  • Your Company Page – Move your cursor over Interests and select Companies. Then search for your Company and click its name in the dropdown list.
  • Groups – Move your cursor over Interests and select Groups. You’ll see the list of groups you are a member of.
  • Recommendations – Go to your profile page and scroll down to the Recommendations box.
  • Polls – Go to polls http://polls.linkedin.com/ or share polls within a group.
  • Students and Alumni – Go to LinkedIn Alumni at //www.linkedin.com/college/.
  • Signal – Go to http://www.linkedin.com/signal or click the Search icon at the top of your homepage and then click Updates in the top left.
  • Manage Team Accounts for Sales Navigator – If you’re a team admin, move your cursor over your profile photo at the top right of your homepage and select Manage Team Accounts.

 

 

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Thank You LinkedIn – NOT Part 2

PUBLISHERS NOTE:  I was able to find this, that explains how to simply post videos and images.  It seems to work pretty well and is self-prompting. It still does’t have the flexibility, of the old SlideShare application, like autostart.  I can’t figure out why they are taking this approach after spending $116M on SlideShare, but it’s not my dime….

PUBLISHERS UPDATE – 5.31.13 – Ive just been informed, and sadly confirmed, that the features below are indeed NOT available to all accounts.  Although it seemed to be no problem to drop the applications across the whole platform, for some reason LinkedIn is only allowing some accounts to upload files.  It has nothing to do with premium status, but I can upload and some of my clients cannot – yet?

 Olympus
BY EMILY PRICE
LinkedIn added the ability to showcase users’ talents in a whole new way Wednesday: pictures and video. Now LinkedIn users can add visual content to their profile pages, giving more depth to the written content already displayed on the site.For instance, a photographer might choose to include several of her best photos, or a copywriter might upload a video of that ad he wrote for last year’s Super Bowl. Architects can upload the blueprints for a building they designed, and musicians can upload videos of past performances.

Visual content can be added to your summary, work experience and education sections on the site, and can come from your computer’s hard drive or from the web.

On the flip side of the equation, people who are browsing profiles on the site can now like or comment on media uploaded to others’ profiles. A sharing option — for sharing content you find interesting with others — is also in the works.

New media-rich profiles are available now for LinkedIn members in English-speaking countries.

To add media to your own profile on LinkedIn click the “Edit” button on your profile page and follow the prompts in the summary, education and experience sections.

What sorts of content will you be adding to your LinkedIn Profile?

Images courtesy of Flickr, Alex Murphy

 

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Thank You LinkedIn –NOT!

LinkedOut

Well they have finally outdone themselves.

I thought all the crashes and “try later” warnings were bad.   Just like the “your contact list is currently not available.”

Then we had to deal with the totally random attacks on keyword stuffing by the LinkedIn Trust & Safety team.  If you look up any keyword on LinkedIn, I guarantee you that the first 4 or 5 pages of results will be keyword stuffed in the projects section. So you do the same thing, or you can’t compete.  I explained this and the fact that they could write a pretty simple algorithm to detect this, not anything like Google, but they never made an effort.

Now, just as I am getting used to my profile supposedly among the top 1% viewed in 2012, we get a total new look:  They have changed all the tabs, removed all the applications, stopped supporting blogs altogether, and cannot tell anyone when they will have the “new application” that will allow you to put up your experiences now supposedly in your summary section -all without any kind of announcement or warning.

WTF?   I make my living (in part) as a LinkedIn coach.  I have spent the better part of a complete day scrambling to read what little documentation they have, and emailing back and forth to other supposed LinkedIn Guru’s (like anyone can figure out what they are likely to do next) to figure out how to work around this latest “improvement.”

Could this have anything to do with their attempts to monetize LinkedIn?  To this point it hasn’t really made any sense to upgrade.  Keep your eyes and ears open for some sort of suggestion that there are plug-ins and gizmos available to Premium users, like video upload etc.

I’ll keep you posted as I sort this out (another day or two I didn’t have to re-invent the wheel) as it is excruciatingly apparent that they won’t.

 

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7 Body Language Tips to Bear in Mind When Negotiating.

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Negative Example: Mr X crooked his wrist and slumped his head sideways, crashing it into the open palm of his right hand.

Positive Example:  Mr X came around from behind his desk walking boldly towards his visitor. The barrier of furniture had been dissolved and Mr X met the gaze of the salesman with a disarming confidence.

Body language can betray or confirm your words. An employee can leave his hopes of a pay rise at the door if during the review he sits slouched with his legs strewn out under his boss’ desk or even in more discreet ways fails to present himself as assertive and capable. Fortunately one can boost their chances with a few tips.

1)     Don’t touch your neck

The neck is a vulnerable area. So don’t touch it. If you are rubbing the back of your neck, lightly pinching your Adam’s apple or doing other inventive neck activity this is likely to lead someone to mistrust you or communicate that obvious fact that you are uncomfortable. You will be unable to strong arm that cockney car salesman as he will jump at the signal his helpless prey has just fired off.

2)     Firm handshake

This is essential. There are few things far worse, excluding flatulence, than a flimsy moist handshake. Bill Clinton claimed he always endeavored to meet the web between the thumb and index finger. This is usually a reliable technique. However a firm handshake is not a vice grip. It is about being expressive not aggressive (not physically at least)

3)     Mr. Mime

Professor Michael Wheeler from Harvard Business School observed that “after two or more people have been in each other’s presence for just a few minutes, their behavior begins to subtly converge…breathing patterns and heart rates sync up, and they also tend to mimic each other’s posture and hand gestures.” Emulation is a sign of flattery. It shows the other party you are at ease and are subconsciously in agreement with them. This is a useful negotiating tool as often it is about aligning your interests with that of another.

4)     Contact

During the presidential debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney both men made use of physical contact. Obama shook hands with Romney and placed his other hand high on Romney’s shoulder. Analysts speculate that this is a gesture of control. It is also one of affection and can melt the corporate armour of the suit jacket. We touch a persons arm to guide them, to show pity, to reassure them. By doing the same in negotiation we tap into all such associations at once.

5)     Fidgeting

To be a good negotiator implies control over a situation. You cannot be in a position of control if you’re twiddling your thumbs, licking your lips whilst impatiently waggling your feet. It will put the other person on edge and scream incompetence. Relax and sit calmly. If you’re going to make any gestures, time them and execute them with conviction.

6)     Posture

If you’re sitting down, sit up and look interested. While you might not need to lunge across the table attacking the space with your elbows it is equally bad to tilt your head back and gaze at the ceiling. If you’re standing, pin those shoulders back to avoid the slouch, pronounce that chest and revert back to a primitive form of masculinity. Just don’t bash on your chest or make any gorilla roars.

7)     Smile

You’re a warm approachable and honest person. Well if you’re not that, at least this should help create that image. One part of business is about transparency, it is simply not desirable to enter any negotiations with a deceitful agent, and people prefer to be assured of credibility. A smile goes a long way here: it tells the other party that you are at ease, unstressed, and personable. In turn they may feel at ease and negotiations can continue untrammeled.

A last note on body language is that all the above can never look too contrived. Body language must be natural otherwise you risk walking around like a creepy robot or unnerving people with mistimed touchy feely gestures.

Featured images:

This article was supplied by Josh Hervall, a keen blogger and negotiation enthusiast. He writes for www.thegappartnership.com, experts in Business Negotiation Training.

 

 

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Forget B-School – Boil An Egg On An Offshore Oil Rig And Get $240,000 A Year

It was the cook who did it. After years of claim and counter claim that Australia was pricing itself out of the raw materials business, a pay claim which would see a cook on an offshore oil and gas rig paid $240,000 a year proved the point about out-of-control costs.

Even the Australian Resources Minister and lifetime union member, Gary Gray, declined to defend the high pay rates on resource projects, particularly offshore liquefied natural gas (LNG) developments.

“We do have unreasonably wage demands in the LNG industry,” Gray told an oil and gas conference in Brisbane yesterday.

A former senior executive with the Australian oil and gas producer, Woodside Petroleum , Gray knows what he is talking about, but the fact that he said it is the real news because he is a member of a pro-labor government and some of his colleagues do not agree with him.

But, even the government’s staunchest defender of high union pay claims, the Minister for Infrastructure, Anthony Albanese, had trouble maintaining his position when it was pointed out that the cook’s pay claim for working on the $34 billion Ichthys LNG project meant he would have a fatter pay packet than the Minister.

“A cook on an oil rig gets paid more money than Anthony Albanese, if he thinks that’s the way we remain internationally competitive he’s on his own,” said Opposition Resources spokesman, Ian Macfarlane.

The latest debate about pay rates occurred at the annual conference of the Australian Petroleum Production & Exploration Association (APPEA), where Gray was among friends and other speakers who picked up where he left off.

One of those was Peter Voser, retiring chief executive of the oil major Royal Dutch Shell , another was Roy Krzywosinski, managing director of Chevron Australia, the local arm the U.S. oil major, Chevron Corporation.

Krzywosinski said that while Australia was in the middle of an LNG-project building boom valued at $160 billion, high costs and high government approval hurdles meant that another $100 billion of LNG projects hung in the balance.

“Governments and industry must make changes now to capture the second wave of investment. There is an 18-to-24 month window in which to do so,” Krzywosinski said.

Voser focused on the need to improve tax policies and government regulation if Australia was to continue attracting investment in its resources sector.

The outlook for new projects in Australia has dimmed since growth in China, the country’s major customer for its exports of iron ore, coal and LNG, started to slow and internal costs exploded leading to the cancellation of a number of proposed developments, including the $40 billion Browse LNG project which has Woodside and Shell as its major investors.

With the cooling in proposed new resource investment has come a series of reality checks, including a sharp fall in the value of the Australian dollar, and a decline in the demand for labor

Forecasts of a shortage of skilled and unskilled workers had led to an international recruiting drive, but have more recently given way to a preference for local labor.

Even Australia’s richest person, Gina Rinehart, who had won approval to import up to 1,700 foreign workers for her $10 billion Roy Hill iron ore mine is now expected to recruit locally – though she will probably be offering pay rates well below the $240,000 demanded by the Ichthys cook.

 

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Penguin 2.0 Losers: Porn Sites, Game Sites, & Big Brands Like Dish.com & The Salvation Army

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angry-penguin-200pxGoogle’s fourth Penguin update — what the company is callingPenguin 2.0 — hit last night, and less than 24 hours later we’re already getting a first chance to look at what sites might be considered “losers” in terms of search visibility.

In a nutshell, the list includes: porn sites, game sites and big brands like Dish.com, the Salvation Army, CheapOair and Educational Testing Service (yes, ETS, the company that makes a lot of those standardized tests you probably took as a child).

The SEO software company, SearchMetrics, has just shared its initial look at what sites have been affected the most by the latest Penguin update. As always, SearchMetrics is using its “SEO Visibility” benchmark, which looks at the visibility of a company’s web pages as they appear (or don’t appear) across a wide range of keywords in Google’s search results.

Here’s their initial list of the 25 biggest Penguin 2.0 losers:

penguin-losers-searchmetrics

There are eight porn sites on the list of 25, and four game-related sites. Of those game sites, three are listed in the top 10. (You have to merge the porn sites listed at the bottom with the sites above them to get the actual order of impact.)

There are also several well-known brands, like Dish.com, the Salvation Army, ETS, and CheapOair. REEDS jewelers has been around since 1946 and has stores in 18 states. DailyDot.com, also on the list, is a respected online news site.

The column on the far right shows how much “SEO Visibility” each website has lost — at least for the keywords that SearchMetrics tracks. This doesn’t necessarily mean that these websites are all seeing dramatic traffic losses, because they might still have high visibility for keywords that aren’t being tracked. That said, in the couple years that we’ve been reporting on the Penguin and Panda updates, lists from SearchMetrics and a couple other SEO software companies have generally been considered mostly accurate.

In his blog post, SearchMetrics founder Marcus Tober says the impact from this latest Penguin update is smaller than he expected.

It’s not the update I was expecting. I thought that this Google Penguin update would have had a bigger impact similar to Panda 1. But that didn’t happen. My first analysis shows that many thin sites, sites with thin links and especially untrusted links face the problem. In addition, some small business sites were hit because they haven’t taken SEO serious enough.

He also told us via email that the impact was much stronger in Germany than in the U.S., and SearchMetrics details some of the Penguin-hit websites in Germany in a separate blog post(German language).

 

 

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14 Revealing Signs You Love Your Startup Job

by Dharmesh Shah – 

You may not be frequently giving out an embarrassingly gushing smile and you might not write little love notes during your lunch break. But, there are ways to tell if you love your job.

Of course, no job is perfect — even the best of relationships have their down days. We all have to do things we don’t like. I love working at HubSpot, it’s the best job I’ve ever had (but, that’s by design). But, even I have “off” days where I’m not spending all my time doing things I absolutely love.love my job small

So all of the following may not be the case all of the time.  But when you love your job, many of the following should be the case much of the time:

1. You don’t talk about other people; you talk about the cool things other people are doing.

“I hear Michelle has really improved our customer happiness scores.” or  “I’d love to know how Mike managed to rescue that sale.” “Sherry developed a new tool that’s made our lives so much better.”

When you love your job you don’t gossip about the personal failings of others. You talk about their successes, because you’re happy for them – and because you’re happy with yourself.

2. You think, “I hope I get to…” instead of, “I hope I don’t have to…”

When you love your job it’s like peeling an onion. There are always more layers to discover and explore.

When you hate your job it’s also like peeling an onion – but all you discover are more tears.

3. You see your internal and external customers not as people to satisfy but simply as people.

They aren’t numbers. You think of them as real people who have real needs.

And you gain a real sense of fulfillment and purpose from taking care of those needs.

4. You enjoy your time at work.

You don’t have to put in time at work and then escape to life to be happy. You believe in enjoying life and enjoying work.

When you love your job, it’s a part of your life. You feel alive and joyful not just at home – but also at work.

5. You would recommend working at your company to your best friend…

In fact, you can’t stop talking about how cool your company is and the awesome work you’re doing even when you’re away from work. Your friends and family are envious.

6. You enjoy attending meetings.

No, seriously, you enjoy meetings. Why? Because it’s fun to be at the center of thoughtful, challenging discussions that lead to decisions, initiatives, and changes – changes you get to be a part of.

7. You don’t think about surviving. You think about winning.

You don’t worry much about losing your job. You’re more worried about not achieving your potential. Not being as impactful as you can be.

8. You see your manager as a person you work with, not for.

You feel valued. You feel respected.

You feel trusted.

9. You don’t want to let your coworkers down.

Not because you’ll get in trouble or get a bad performance review, but because you admire them – and you want them to admire you.

10. You hardly ever look at the clock.

You’re too busy making things happen. When you do look at the clock, you often find that the time has flown.

11. You view success in terms of fulfillment and gratification – not just promotions and money.

Everyone wants to be promoted. Everyone wants to earn more.

You definitely feel that way too… but somewhere along the way your job has come to mean a lot more to you than just a paycheck. And if you left this job, even if for a lot higher salary… you would still miss it.

A lot.

12. You leave work with items on your to-do list you’re excited about tackling tomorrow.

Many people cross the “fun” tasks off their to-do lists within the first hour or two.

You often have cool stuff – new initiatives, side projects, hunches you want to confirm with data, people you want to talk to – left over when it’s time to go home.

13. You help without thinking.

You like seeing your colleagues succeed, so it’s second nature to help them out. You pitch in automatically.

And they do the same for you.

14. You can’t imagine being somewhere else.

You’re having too much fun.  Learning too much.

How many of the above statements apply to you and your job?

If you said:
0-3: You may want to find a new job. Life is too short.
4-6: You don’t hate your job… but you don’t love it either. What can you do differently?
7-10: You really enjoy your job and the people you work with
11-14: You are deeply, madly in love with your job! (and your friends are definitely jealous!)

 

 

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