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Choosing those that choose you

10 Nov

by Seth Godin –icn.seths.head

We have the privilege about being picky in who we expect/hope/count on/need to pick us.

Pity the foolish 8-year-old boy who gives a kid just a year older the power to make his day. In that moment, being picked for the kickball team is the most important thing in the world, and his dreams are in the hands of a kid with a demonstrated history of poor judgment. If you were walking by the playground and he yelled, “Hey Mister! Wanna be on our team?” it would (I hope) mean little to you. You’re no longer willing to be judged by a kid who can’t even ride a bike.

But what if your organization or your brand or your self esteem has chosen a chooser you can’t rely on,  or one you’re not qualified to expect to have come through? If you say, “we need 100 of the top CIOs at the biggest companies in this region to choose our technology,” you’ve made it clear who the choosers are. But if this group is swayed by bribes (which you won’t pay) or local salespeople (which you don’t have), you have a disconnect.

Or what if you “need” to be picked by the anonymous crowds on social networks, or picked by the apparently powerful editor or the bouncer at the club?

A huge swath of human unhappiness is generated by selecting someone to pick you, only to have that person abuse the power, let you down or otherwise seduce you into pursuing something that’s not going to happen. Unchoose those people as choosers.

The person or organization you’re seeking to be chosen by: Do they have a good track record? Do they choose wisely? Coherently? Reliably? Do they abuse their power, seducing you into acting against your interests? Do they make you miserable? Do they have good taste?

Do you have the resources and reputation necessary to be picked by someone like the person you’re needing to be chosen by?

If you’ve signed up to be approved by, selected by, promoted by or otherwise chosen by someone who’s not going to respond to your efforts, it’s not a smart choice.

And one last thing: The ultimate privilege is to pick ourselves. To decide that the most important person to be chosen by is ourself.

If you pick yourself as the chooser, if you give yourself the power to say ‘go’, I hope you’ll respect how much power you have, and not waste it.

Choosing those that choose you

We have the privilege about being picky in who we expect/hope/count on/need to pick us.

Pity the foolish 8-year-old boy who gives a kid just a year older the power to make his day. In that moment, being picked for the kickball team is the most important thing in the world, and his dreams are in the hands of a kid with a demonstrated history of poor judgment. If you were walking by the playground and he yelled, “Hey Mister! Wanna be on our team?” it would (I hope) mean little to you. You’re no longer willing to be judged by a kid who can’t even ride a bike.

But what if your organization or your brand or your self esteem has chosen a chooser you can’t rely on,  or one you’re not qualified to expect to have come through? If you say, “we need 100 of the top CIOs at the biggest companies in this region to choose our technology,” you’ve made it clear who the choosers are. But if this group is swayed by bribes (which you won’t pay) or local salespeople (which you don’t have), you have a disconnect.

Or what if you “need” to be picked by the anonymous crowds on social networks, or picked by the apparently powerful editor or the bouncer at the club?

A huge swath of human unhappiness is generated by selecting someone to pick you, only to have that person abuse the power, let you down or otherwise seduce you into pursuing something that’s not going to happen. Unchoose those people as choosers.

The person or organization you’re seeking to be chosen by: Do they have a good track record? Do they choose wisely? Coherently? Reliably? Do they abuse their power, seducing you into acting against your interests? Do they make you miserable? Do they have good taste?

Do you have the resources and reputation necessary to be picked by someone like the person you’re needing to be chosen by?

If you’ve signed up to be approved by, selected by, promoted by or otherwise chosen by someone who’s not going to respond to your efforts, it’s not a smart choice.

And one last thing: The ultimate privilege is to pick ourselves. To decide that the most important person to be chosen by is ourself.

If you pick yourself as the chooser, if you give yourself the power to say ‘go’, I hope you’ll respect how much power you have, and not waste it.

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