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Becoming a “legal” immigrant aint what it used to be.

10 Oct

I am getting pretty fed up with headlines like “Immigrant DESTROYS Sanctuary City BS In Under A Minute.”

Steve Ulrich shared a video.

In  other words, “you lazy assholes, I did it so suck it up and do it yourself.”

Well you did it 45 years ago buddy.  Things  have changed.

Not quite as easy now days. It’s a lottery system to start the process lf gettiing a green card. Some categories are just now accepting people who applied from Mexico 22DEC95. Then they have to live here for 5 years and keep all the paperwork up to date. Oh, up to date to whatever Trump and his buddies change it to. https://travel.state.gov/…/visa-bulletin-for-october-2018.h…

Immigrating to the United States is often a difficult process. In addition, there may be long delays due to backlogs. In order to maintain an orderly immigration process, the United States has established a waiting list system. While this makes for an orderly process, it can create backlogs of many years for certain countries and certain categories. Understanding how the system works will better allow you to estimate how long it will take a person to actually immigrate to the United States. It will also help you to understand why some people seem to immigrate quickly while others take much longer.

Approximately 350,000 per year persons can immigrate to the United States as family preference relatives. There are four family preferences:

First preference – Unmarried Sons and Daughters of U.S. Citizens: 23,400 per year plus any numbers not required for fourth preference.

Second preference – Spouses and Children, and Unmarried Sons and Daughters of Permanent Residents: 114,200 per year, plus the number (if any) by which the worldwide family preference level exceeds 226,000 per year, plus any unused first preference numbers.

Divided into two categories:

  • 2A – Spouses and Children of Permanent Residents: 77% of the overall second preference limitation, of which 75% are exempt from the per-country limit;
  • 2B – Unmarried Sons and Daughters (21 years of age or older) of Permanent Residents: 23% of the overall second preference limitation.

Third Preference – Married Sons and Daughters of U.S. Citizens: 23,400 per year, plus any numbers not required by first and second preferences.

Fourth Preference – Brothers and Sisters of Adult U.S. Citizens: 65,000 per year, plus any numbers not required by first three preferences.

Since there are over two million eligible people in the family preference category but only 350,000 spaces available, not all of them will be allowed to immigrate this year. Most preferences have become oversubscribed, creating backlogs. This means that some persons in those preferences must wait until the next year to immigrate and some, even longer.

Individuals immigrating under the First Preference category for all countries have often retrogressed and have long wait times.

Persons who fall in the Second Preference for spouses and children under 21 years old often have wait times. Generally, persons who are Second Preference sons and daughters over the age of 21 have longer wait times. Sons and daughters over the age of 21 from Mexico and the Philippines have the longest wait times.

The third preference backlog has long wait times. The Philippines and Mexico usually have much longer family preference backlogs than the rest of the countries in the world.

Historically, Fourth Preference has been greatly oversubscribed usually with long wait times.

Your family member’s preference category will determine how long they will have to wait for an immigrant visa number. For visa availability information, see the Visa Bulletin section below.

Litwin & Smith has helped hundred, if not thousands, of U.S. Citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents file family petitions for spouses and family members. Our law practice is limited to immigration. Our firm is nationally recognized as a premiere immigration law firm. We routinely provide immigration assistance to foreign nationals from all over the world. When you are ready to proceed just let us know.

Employment Preferences

There are approximately 140,000 people per year who can immigrate under the five employment preferences per year. Employment preferences are as follows:

First Preference – Priority Workers: 28.6% of the worldwide employment-based preference level, plus any numbers not required for fourth and fifth preferences.

Second Preference – Members of the Professions Holding Advanced Degrees or Persons of Exceptional Ability: 28.6% of the worldwide employment-based preference level, plus any numbers not required by first preference.

Third Preference – Skilled Workers, Professionals, and Other Workers: 28.6% of the worldwide level, plus any numbers not required by first and second preferences, not more than 10,000 of which to “Other Workers.”

Fourth Preference – Certain Special Immigrants: 7.1% of the worldwide level.

Fifth Preference – Employment Creation: 7.1% of the worldwide level, not less than 3,000 of which reserved for investors in a targeted rural or high-unemployment area, and 3,000 set aside for investors in regional centers by Sec. 610 of Pub. L. 102-395.

Except for the Other Workers category and some people from the Philippines, China, and India, employment preferences currently have no serious backlog for Second Preference and a 2-3 years backlog for Third Preference. However, the government processing time is considerable. Even when there is no per country backlog, the average processing time a labor certification/visa petition/adjustment of status process is approximately 1½ to 3 years. (For more information about immigrating under an employment preference, see “Would You Like to Immigrate to the United States Through Investment?” and “Would You Like to Work in the United States?“)

For visa availability information, see the Visa Bulletin section below.

Litwin & Smith is a nationally recognized preiere immigration firm. We have been very successful in preparing and obtaining nonimmigrant and subsequent immigrant visas and green cards for employees and their families. We prepare hundreds of such petitions each year. When you are ready to proceed just let us know.

Other Factors Affecting Immigration

Besides an overall cap as to the number of people who can immigrate to the United States in one year, there are other factors which affect how quickly a person can immigrate to the United States, including:

1. Country of Nationality

Congress has established a maximum limit as to the number of people that can come from any one country in any given year. Historically, certain countries in the world have contributed more immigrants than others. Currently, there are four countries in the world which reach their maximum each year: China, India, Mexico, and Philippines. Persons who are born in these countries therefore, have a greater likelihood of having to wait longer to be able to immigrate than persons in the same preference category from other countries.

2. Per Cent Allocations Between Preferences

The law does not allocate equal numbers to each preference category, nor is there equal demand for each preference category. For example, family first preference (unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens) is allocated 23,400 visa numbers per year. Fourth preference (brothers and sisters of adult U.S. citizens) is allocated almost three times as many visa numbers per year, 65,000. Unfortunately, currently over 1.5 million people are waiting in Fourth Preference. Therefore, there are substantial delays in this category.

3. Fall Down

The law requires that all numbers be used each year. Under certain circumstances, one category may not use all of its numbers. The leftover numbers usually fall down to a lower preference category. For example, if all the numbers allocated for Family First Preference are not used up in a year, the unused numbers would go to Family Second Preference to be used by spouses and sons and daughters of permanent residents. Brothers and sisters of United States citizens are eligible to receive any numbers not used by the first three Family preferences. Unfortunately, no unused numbers ever reach fourth preference.

Visa Bulletin

Each month, the State Department notifies the public as to who can actually immigrate to the United States that particular month. Visa bulletin information is available through the Department of State, our website, or by calling (650) 588-7100. Based on the preferences (remember that immediate relatives are not limited, and therefore, are not included in the Visa Bulletin), three pieces of information are given based on each category.

Current: means no backlog exists at all and everyone in that category can immigrate, assuming all of the paperwork has been properly completed. When a category is current, it is noted in the Bulletin by the letter “C”.

Unavailable: means no visas are available that month for the category. Therefore, no one who fits within that category can immigrate to the United States. When there are no numbers available, this is designated by the letter “U”.

Cut-Off Date: by considering all of the factors explained earlier, the State Department tries to estimate how many people can be allowed to immigrate in a given month so that all the numbers available for that year will be used up by the end of the year. They do this by establishing cut-off dates. These dates are used by the Immigration Service and the State Department so they can issue visas to people who then become permanent residents of the United States that month.

Each person who is within one of the family or employment preferences is given a priority date. This is the date that a visa petition or labor certification was filed on the person’s behalf. By keeping track of that date, it can be estimated, by looking at the Visa Bulletin, how quickly a person will be able to immigrate to the United States.

When persons file visa petitions for family members, they usually want to know how soon their relatives will be able to immigrate to the United States. When employment based visas are filed, people want to know how long until they can immigrate. The best way to estimate the time it will take for a category to move to a particular date is to check with the State Department for a few months to see how fast the cut off dates are moving in the particular category. By looking at the cutoff date and calculating the speed it is moving, it is possible to estimate how long it will take for that priority date to become current.

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