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The Junk Email Account from Hell

 

 

 

 

Can anyone out there help me?  Not a huge fan of getting Betty White on my screen 6 times a day!

I know I can close my account, and I did set it up to be a “catch all” for minor spam, but  it is on so many of my sign-ins it would take me a week to re-designate them all.

I just returned from a wonderful week in Cabo San Lucas to find that I have been found by the most pernicious e-mail spam generator I have ever seen.  This guy is persistent, frequent, mostly all the same format and he is sending to a fictitious name I haven’t used in a year or so.  It really has me scratching my head.

  1. Why after no activity on my account for a solid week would they choose to attack me?
  2. I didn’t change my security settings or sign up for anything while I was away.
  3. How in the world did it start coming to “Furd Farkel?” That is a name I put on a couple of white paper requests over a year ago.

Of course, most of the templates have a provision to opt-out, but they also are claiming to take from 3-5 business days for the opt out to go into effect.  At t he rate these guys are going, that will be over 100 emails.

I have been receiving things from the following list:

Devry University   –   DeVry University [info@twoesnagel.com]

levitra-pro.sales@swifttrans.com

Aggaston Fund Network   –  Advance Update [updates@monclerto.com]    a “cash advance” for $1400 I didn’t ask for)

Pimsleur Language – Incredible Learning [languagelearning@leonardfest.com] guaranteed to have you speaking a different language in 10 days

Bosley For Women [lead_class@imopolyportal.com]  – hair restoration

Energy Maker [getelectric@e-voiceoverdsl.com] – “free” energy

Rapid Refinance [rapidrefinance@usamadeusmail.com] – 30 year fixed for 3.1% and no credit check ?

Vin DiCarlo [Seduction@datasyndicationservices.com] – where I was one of only 3 people selected to become irresistible to all women

Federal Bureau of Investigation [donotreply@fbi.gov] – for only $135 handling fee, they send me $200,00US

EFCC FRAUD ALERT [info@e-maxtronic.com.tw] –   $200K just for all your account information

Mrs. Regina Ahmed [andyjoseph789@gmail.com] – who has $200,000,000 she wants me to hand out for her and will let me keep 20% for my trouble

Overstocked Auctions [info@quiraarab.com] – comes every hour

Pintrest Card Give Away [lead_class@miskincare.com]  – free $150 card for filling out a survey
 

This is about half of what I got in a two hour period, and none of them had ever showed up before.  If any of you out there recognize the  URL’s or have any insights as to how to get off this insidious band-wagon short of dumping the account, please let me know.

 

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Dr. Mike is a Free-kin Rock Star

Congratulations Dr. Mike for a Job Well Done

Days like this don’t happen often enough in this business.  One of my clients published his first website today, and I was actually around to push the button when he went live.

I met Dr. Mike years ago.  We were both in the same church band; in fact we were both bass players in the same church band.  We rotated Sundays and it worked out well as there was another church requiring my services every other weekend.  There was never a feeling of competition, and although we didn’t see each other all that often our relationship was friendly and we became “friends” on FaceBook and LinkedIn.  After a few years the church and I were going in different directions musically, and philosophically.  My Buddhist girlfriend (now wife) was tolerant of some of the egregious language of the Evangelical Christian  Church (everybody is OK as long as they think exactly the way we do…) but not enthusiastic over spending our Sundays driving a half hour each direction to do so.  They had found yet another bass player so we just drifted off.

Mike started Chiropractic school with a vengeance, and kissed his wife goodbye for a couple of years to become a slave to the classrooms and studies.  After the rigorous course, and several panic attacks during exams, Mike was ready to hang up his shingle and announce his practice (again on FaceBook and LinkedIn) and I began to follow him.  Oh the joys of social media, being re-connected with old friends.

Forgetting that age had crept up on me my back went out while engaged in some construction activity that should probably have been left for a man half my age.  It took a few days for me to become convinced that it was not somehow going to miraculously work itself out, and would indeed require the intervention of a skilled practitioner.  It was so bad that walking was almost out of the question, and ice and heat were required to merely sit in front of a football game on television.

Remembering our association, and the current status of Dr. Mike the Chiropractor, it was easy to recall my pleasant experiences with the service and call upon his expertise to alleviate my current condition.  The only negative memory of Chiropractic being that my health plan sucks, and it can be a bit expensive out of pocket.  This minor setback was alleviated after my first visit with our agreement to barter his services for mine as an internet marketing consultant.  As it turns out, so was my back pain.  In a matter of 3 weeks it was loose and relatively painless and the mobility returned to the point that noon 2 mile hikes were back in the picture.

Every visit to his office was accompanied by an hour or so of marketing discussions.  We went over Facebook, Youtube, Hotmail, Blogs, google.com, Markets, Websites, Products, WordPress, Linkedin, youtube videos, and general integration into social media.

The past few visits he has come up to the office and we really got down with our website provider and started to create.  His work is as outstanding on the site is it is at his practice.  It is truly satisfying to have a client listen and take the advice that one works so hard to provide.  At the suggestion of one of my associates, I have for some time, really not encouraged any of my clients to do any of their own work; it simply usually doesn’t get done.

Even with a newborn first child at home, Dr. Mike has written some 20 technical blogs revolving around healthcare and Chiropractic medicine.  It was with great pride that this humble internet marketer was able to watch the birth of www.rogersonchiropractic.com.  Well done Dr. Mike!

 

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There is Nothing Like a Good Long Storm to Make You Appreciate The Sunshine

Joni Mitchell was right; you don’t know what you have till it’s gone.  The past couple of weeks it has rained pretty much nonstop.  I feel like we’re back in my wife’s hometown of Hazel Dell, a suburb of Portland.  Never knew how people could live there, too freeking rainy.  The big difference between here (San Francisco area) and there is that we get breaks between showers.  They can go for literally weeks without seeing the sun.

Today we had a break for a couple of hours and I took a walk.  There were kids out playing on their skateboards, women washing dogs, others taking walks or riding bikes.  It was like the old Chicago song:  Saturday, in the park… It felt just like the 4th of July.  All that was missing were the Mexican vendors with their push-carts full of ice cream.  It was T-shirt weather for that hour, even though the temperature read 49’.  In the sun it felt like we were back in Cabo San Lucas.  Funny, when we were down there I didn’t even go for a walk last time.  It seems as though we appreciate things when they are scarce, as the sun was today.

There is much to the texture thing.  Humans often don’t appreciate things without it.  Three years ago who would have thought that we would be ecstatic that the market was back up over 12,000?  When the Silicon Valley was in its “heyday”, a thousand dollar lunch bill just went into the Advertising and Entertainment budget.  Now Mary and I get excited by a free vendor dinner at the Fairmont.  There used to be secretaries and admins to do things like typing and filing.  The internet was a tool and emails were a means of communication, not a burdensome task to filter through in the morning.

Belt tightening can be a good thing.  People learn to do their own typing, publishing, and organizing.  It is a better head space for most of us to be responsible for all of our own actions instead of blustering through the day only to dump the follow-up on someone else’s desk.

Cigarettes used to be 50 cents, gas 29 cents a gallon and what did we do as a country?  More people died from tobacco than anything else, and the average car was a V-8 that got 8 miles to the gallon.  There was no concern for health, carbon footprint, global warming, or anything other than how much steak and potatoes we could fit into our bloated bodies.  Our businesses were every bit as bad.

The new era has brought about many changes:  My car is a Prius that gets 50 miles to the gallon, my office is a converted bedroom in my house, that (the house) is a tremendously downsized version of the one where my kids were raised (but it’s paid for), my business is on the internet helping other folks sell what they do, and my sirloin habit has been cut down from three days a week to once a month.

I actually appreciate it all now.  The walk in the sun, the occasional steak, that I can now type 50 words a minute, all came from necessity.  The contrast in life is what makes us appreciate what we have.

 

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History of Cabo San Lucas

Before Cabo San Lucas was known as the tourist town it is today, the beaches were inhabited by a nomadic Guaycura Amerindian group called Pericu. The Pericú were hunters and gatherers; the shores around Cabo made it easy to live off of shellfish, small game and wild plants. There is also evidence that they were skilled weavers and potters as well.

The Cabo coastline remained untouched by European explorers until 1542, when Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo, a Spaniard, made the first contact with the Pericu people while exploring the waters of the Pacific for the Spanish monarchy. The Spanish forces remained because of the threat of English pirates in the area. The harbor at Cabo San Lucas continued to be used by pirates until the mid-18th Century as a hiding place after attacks on Manila Galleons (you can see a ship similar to these in the harbor). The pirates also enjoyed the many coves and inlets, perfect places for stashing loot. After pirating became a thing of the past, the port was mostly ignored because of the lack of fresh water available there.

More activity came to the harbor at the end of the 19th Century. Baja-californianos began exporting bark from the local palo blanco tree, to be processed and used in leather tanning. This made Cabo San Lucas a main shipping port. With the increase of nautical traffic, the Faro Viejo lighthouse was built in 1890 by port authorities at the nearby Cabo Falso.

The abundance of tuna in Cabo was discovered in the early 20th Century, and in 1917 an American tuna cannery was moved from San Diego to Cabo San Lucas to take advantage of this new resource. This brought a new population that continued to grow even as the native population dwindled. By the 1930s, a small fishing village had developed to supply the cannery. The harbor was then occupied by about 400 people, all of whom were involved in the canning industry. This remained the driving force of the local economy until 1941, when a hurricane destroyed a large part of the factory. The damage was devastating and Cabo San Lucas was all but abandoned during World War II, when Japanese submarines patrolled the coast.

After the war, leisure travel became a popular activity and Cabo was rediscovered as a game-fish paradise. Word of mouth brought a sport-fishing craze to the cape in the 1950s and 1960s and Cabo became a hot spot for catching prize-winning marlin and other swordfish. During this time, the small village grew in size to about 1500 residents (not including the many seasonal fishermen that were brought in by plane or boat to fish the cape). The slow but steady pace of growth changed in 1973 when the Transpeninsular Highway was completed. This new link by land between the United States and Cabo San Lucas brought even more traffic to the area. The city soon became a popular destination for people traveling by car and recreational vehicle, in addition to those who already came by boat or plane.

Nowadays, the small fishing village has become a bustling tourist attraction. Cabo San Lucas has increased its numbers and now boasts a population of almost 25,000. The majority of people who call this place home make their living from the tourist industry and most of them are recent arrivals seeking work. Many small shops and boutiques line the streets with souvenirs and handcrafted Cabo clothing. Tour guides are ready to show off the spectacular coastline (and the sights under the water too). Affordable boating adventures and tours await those ready to take to the waves and are a sign that Cabo is no longer an exclusive yacht club just for the upper class sports fishermen.

Great fishing is not the only activity that brings people to the southernmost tip of the Baja peninsula. First class golfing attracts sportsmen of a different kind, while the beaches bring legions of sunbathers each year. Scuba diving is also a popular draw for visitors; the beautiful waters are great for watching exotic, colorful marine life.

Despite deep roots in the past, so richly displayed at the Museo de las Californias, Cabo San Lucas has a distinctly modern feel. It is far enough away from home to be a great getaway, without feeling too foreign.

 

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Cabo Without Uncle Buck is Like Drinking Beer From a Can

It’s good, but it just doesn’t taste right.

I’m tempted to go into my “fear and loathing” mode and begin to reflect tales of drunkenness and debauchery unparalleled in the relatively sane universes of my faithful followers.  It would be satisfying to sit at my keyboard and reflect on the dozens of times we’ve hung upside down at the Giggling Marlin, crashed our Sea Doo’s at 50 miles an hour and walked away without a scratch, or summoned the Mariachis to our room at 2:00AM to serenade our sleeping wives.  Ah yes, that would be tempting indeed; Perhaps another day when I have the time.  Today I must pack.

The past few trips I have made with my darling, and utterly sane, wife.  It is a welcome romantic getaway and much easier on my wallet and liver.  This ends up being a Disneyland storybook vacation filled with whale watching, great cuisine, snorkeling at Chileno, diving at Cabo Pulmo, yachting on a former America’s Cup yacht, and making love on the beach.  It is so wholesome I often anticipate Doris Day or Frankie and Annette approaching us with fresh baked muffins, butter, and honey.

We are trying to eat healthy, will hit the Gym and take long walks about the golf course early in the morning.  Brian Flynn had to give up his bar, but we will probably search the downtown in vain just one more time to see if he has gravitated back to the Cabo Wabo orbit.  Other than that our late nights are now relegated to a rare cigar and a cocktail at Pitahayas before retiring by 11:00.

I have been coming to Cabo since my parents took me on a Mexican cruise in 1968.  I realize that that is most likely before most of you were born.  Things have changed a bit in that time.  When I first saw Cabo there were only three hotels, the harbor was roughed out but no boats were anchored near it.  There were no shops on it.  Bud Parr was the reigning landlord and you could rent a panga for $10 per hour and catch enough fish your first day to eat for a week.

The Office was a thatched shack on the beach, by itself, and  was a common occurrence to have a couple of tequilas with the locals and play volleyball (they cheated) before ambling down the beach to hear the Hispanic version of Hotel California butchered by the locals at El Dolphin as the bartender peddled his little $25 bindles of  10% cocaine to supplement the meager salary and tips left by the gringo ex-pats.

The first iteration of the Giggling Marlin miraculously burned to the ground as a direct result of the lack of proper payment to local “authorities” and employment of a sufficient number of local staff.   The “Trailer Park” restaurant was in the center of town, and there were not 15 other restaurants sporting the same name littering the “corridor turistico.”  Actually, back then it was just a road.

The point of all this is that I will be there this whole week.  Through the magic of technology and incredible foresight rendered me by my mentor Jay Berkowitz and USF, I am able to schedule this blog to mysteriously leap upon your screen even in my absence.   I hoist a tequila in your honor, pray for your continued health and success, and attempt to enjoy the Cabo, and the man that is present now.  It is supposed to hit 25’ tonight in Redwood City.  I will be sleeping with the door open and only a sheet covering me at Hacienda Del Mar.

Vaya con dios

Modern Cabo San Lucas. Cabo San Lucas Before Dredging.

Cabo’s marina was dredged out of a dry mudflat in 1974 and 1975. Until that time, a landing strip and the houses of cannery workers occupied the area shown here. Cabo San Lucas, c. 1970, right, from the construction site of the Hotel Finisterra. Note cannery still in operation, Hotel Hacienda on low sand dune at left, and landing strip where today’s marina is now located. (Reprinted with permission from The Unforgettable Sea of Cortez.)

 

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