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DOING SEO AFTER PANDA UPDATE

Google regularly updates and changes its search algorithm. After the Panda update, many website with high rankings, found that the rankings had dropped like a stone. It seems Google is trying to reward websites which are high in quality over the countless junk sites. The websites whose rankings dropped were mainly those which had bad HTML, poor SEO and broken links. Therefore, the strategy after Panda has to be changed, in order to get good search engine rankings.

 

 SEO strategies which have diminished value after Panda:

* Mass Link building – though it still works, it seems that it’s the days are numbered. Google search engines will start detecting these sites and they will be doomed.

* Article marketing in bulk – this will go down the same path as mass link building. Since mass articles generally have spun or duplicate content, they will be easily spotted by the search engines.

* Exchanging links – two-way links, multiple links etc are already obsolete. For ranking purposes it seems to be an outdated strategy.

* Buying links – Google has always frowned upon this practice and bans sites which indulge in it. It may not be a good idea for SEO.

* Repetition of anchor text – repetition of anchor text is not a good way to improve rankings. It is better to have a variety of keywords, which helps direct the search towards the site.

 

 SEO strategies which work after the introduction of the Panda update:

Even after Panda, by using a combination of good content and SEO, you will be able to maintain a high rank. These are some of the techniques which will help in getting and maintaining a good rank with search engines.

* Guest Post blogging:

The links that you place in your guest post, work very well in directing traffic towards your website. Guest posting should be one of the foundations on which you build your website. If your guest post is published in well-recognized authoritative sites, then the benefits to your site are immense.

* Article marketing:

Article marketing through Ezine articles and Articlebase do help in SEO ranking. However, they are now not as effective as they were before. They do help in SEO strategy since the articles contain original content and the link to your site.

* Social media:

Though the use of social media does not help in SEO, it adds votes in your favor from a very wide base. This will help you in gaining recognition and also helps building your brand image.

 Use of better quality blog content which have been SEO’d:

Though content are not the only criteria for building a website, good quality content will please visitors and have spin-off benefits. Even here the use of SEO is relatively important since your keywords will help keep the message focused.

 Get recognized as an authoritative source:

Instead of doing unethical things to stay ahead of the competition, by supplying high quality content, which can be backed by reliable sources, you will be respected as a person whose writing can be trusted. It is wise to know which niche you are well versed in and stick to it; instead of trying to be a “Jack of all trades and master of none”.

 

 Use natural link building, on-page SEO etc.:

When you are building a link, contained within the original content, then it should be to a related topic to seem natural. This way Google will not treat it as spam. Even today, it is relevant to have your content with good SEO.

Panda has forced a rethink on SEO strategies. SEO done by hand is bound to be safe from updates. If you create quality content which matches the SEO, then you will not face any problem with your ranking. By assiduously building a site, you will be benefited in the long run.

Author bio:

Tom is a regular contributor to www.make-a-web-site.com

 

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Why Flash and Animated Websites Can Be Bad for Business

by Chris Bolton

Click to View Animated Gif

I love special effects, video games, and Sci-Fi movies. But I can’t stand a slow-loading animated website when I’m trying to accomplish a purpose. If I’m trying to get some information or buy a product, I want the shortest distance between my mouse and my goal. This is why Flash websites can sometimes do more damage than good. Sure, you’ve got a goldfish swimming behind the article you’re trying to read and fireworks following every move of the cursor–that’s a nifty trick–but I can’t read anything on the site, and it takes forever for all the graphics to load.

Most people who work in the web-world know that Adobe Flash-based websites have numerous issues. They don’t work on manymobile devices; they load slow; they can’t be read by Google (which means they get poor search engine ranking).

That being said, what if there was a solution that worked better than Flash–something that loaded faster and played nice with Google? Would we all start building websites that snow, sparkle, flip upside down, and make burps when we click buttons?

Well, there are alternatives to Flash these days. HTML5 is the most promising, and as it is more widely adopted, you will see more websites with HTML5 animation. But this is where I think we need to pause . . .

Just because we have these tools doesn’t mean we should run out and start dousing our sites in animated menus, dancing puppies, and scrolling banners.

Here are 5 reasons I think you should think twice before creating a website that relies heavily on any kind of animated effects.

1. Shiny/Flashy/Moving Things are Distracting

Things that blink, buzz, and whir serve a good purpose. There is a reason why we have traffic signs that blink, sirens that scream, and alarm clocks that buzz. These things are designed to tear our attention away from whatever we were trying to do in the first place and PAY ATTENTION. This is never a pleasant experience. Ambulance sirens scare the hell out of me, but I’m generally forgiving because they are serving a public good. If your website starts screaming, talking, spinning, or blinking, it might just scare the hell out of me as well. But my reaction will not be so forgiving. In fact I will never go to your website again.

2. Slow Load Time

Even if you have super-fast internet, your fans and customers may not. You’ve got about 2 seconds to engage your audience before they click onto the next thing. Loading excess animations and video will slow down your site load time. Also, putting a video or song on your website is great, but don’t make it auto-play. If your visitor wants to watch or listen, they will push play and they will usually wait a reasonable about of time for it to load. But most users like to choose whether to watch a video or not.

3. Animations Often Force an Experience

The internet is full of options. People like options. If a fancy animation loads when you land on a website, you are forced to watch it before you can go on to what you were trying to accomplish. The perfect example of this is a “splash page.” This is a page that loads prior to landing on a homepage and usually features some kind of animation or ad. Now if I’m trying to locate a concert date, buy your eBook, or perform any other transaction on your site, a splash page serves a s a barrier between your site and my intended action. If I’m on a mobile phone it could break your website completely.

4. Inconsistent Mobile and Tablet Experiences

More and more people are using phones and tablets to access the internet and leaving their desktops to gather dust. Creating animations that work well on a big screen and a tiny phone screen is a tough challenge and it often fails. The best mobile experience, in my opinion, is a simple one. I’m usually in transit when I use my phone and I want my information fast. Ask yourself what you want people to do on your website and make that super easy to do on any device.

5. Search Ranking

Search engines, like Google, are great at reading text. They are not-so-great at reading images and animations. Sure, HTML5 will be easier for Google to handle then flash, but because of the potential for keyword stuffing and hidden text, words that are embedded in images will probably not be given the same weight as text on the page.

All this being said, I love special effects and animation and there are some awesome interactive websites that are exceptions to the rule because they are designed as a novelty or a multimedia experience. But if you’re trying to grow your fan base and readership and sell some merchandise, you don’t need special effects. You just need a great-looking website that is easy to use.

 

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Top 5 iPad Apps for Programmers

The Apple Market now boasts a vast selection of iPad apps, and while there is always a great deal of attention on the newest, one category in particular seems to always get short-changed: apps for programmers. One list won’t change that, but we hope to get the balling rolling in the right direction with our choices for the top 5 iPad apps for programmers. These are apps that will get more out of your iPad, and make you a more productive coder.

1. Dropbox

Dropbox is the ultimate iPad-accessible cloud service for a number of reasons: It’s free for up to 2 GB worth of storage, it’s incredibly easy to use and it is extremely fast. Since programmers are primarily dealing in text files, 2 GB is more than enough to store all their work for any given project or two and have it be accessible wherever they are: in the office, at home or on the road.

2. FTPOnTheGo

Most professional programmers work as a part of a team, and an FTP server is usually an integral aspect of keeping that team fully connected. Before now, there wasn’t a convenient or powerful way to access an FTP server from your iPad. The all-new FTPOnTheGo app, on the other hand, supports browsing, deletion, renaming, chmod and it even allows you to edit those files seamlessly using an external editor.

3. iMockups

As a programmer, we’re most productive when we’re left alone and behind our favored workstation. But that isn’t our usual reality. We have meetings, conferences, responsibilities to our children and so forth. Well, iMockups is an incredibly cool app that lets you do something productive during your downtime, such as building mockups of websites and other user interfaces.

4. Omnigraffle

Omnigraffle is like iMockups except that it allows you draw sophisticated diagrams by dragging and dropping various shapes and objects. If you’re familiar with the Mac version of Omnigraffle, then you know this one too; it doesn’t miss a beat. For the programmer who works with workflow diagrams, there simply isn’t another app available for the iPad that provides as much capability as this one does.

5. Markup

For the programmer, one of the limitations to actually writing code on the iPad is the lack of support for markup. Writing in plain text simply doesn’t cut it any longer. The languages are too complex, and we’re often working under a substantial time crunch. Markup is a basic – basic in a good way – editor that supports markup for HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP and so forth, and it even allows you to create folders and files with proper extensions from right within the program.

Miles Walker is a freelance writer and blogger who usually looks at car insurance deals over at CarinsuranceComparison.Org. His most recent review looked at the best car insurance quotes.

 

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