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Tag Archives: Job hunting

Handling Rejection At Work

It can be crushing and infuriating to be denied a raise or passed over for a promotion you know you deserve. But let’s face it, business is business, and it doesn’t take your personal needs and emotions into account. So although you will of course have a strong reaction whenever things don’t go your way at work, your response needs to be professional and handled with tact. Here’s how to deal with professional letdown in your job.

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What Not To Do

Don’t get emotional, pouty, or openly upset. Be professional; you should not start badmouthing your boss to your coworkers or explaining to colleagues why the person who got the promotion over you is less qualified. Stem the outrage and indignation, and focus instead on the reasons for having been passed over. There are reasons, and your employers have a justification for having refused you. So don’t send out a passive aggressive email or call your boss to ask why you were turned down. In fact, keep that question why not? entirely to yourself.

What To Do

The first thing to do is to schedule a sit down meeting with your supervisor. This is business, professionalism requires being straightforward and direct. Rather than asking why not, explain openly that you had expected to receive the advancement, and ask what you need to change to insure that you aren’t passed over next time such an opportunity arises. Show that you are invested in long-term growth with the company and that you aren’t satisfied with career stagnation.

Depending on what you learn from your boss, this is also probably a good time to have a chat with a headhunter. They can be a great resource to help assess your position in the industry, and can give an honest answer as to what others in the field are earning and how quickly they typically advance. You might find out your expectations were unrealistic, or you could find out its time to jump ship.

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Most of all, it is essential to remain as dispassionate as possible when evaluating your next step. Don’t dwell on the disappointment. Rather, use it as an opportunity for self-assessment and growth. Have you reached the limit of your advancement at the company? Are you not doing enough to promote the interests of the business? If there are better career options out there, the rejection may be a sign that it is time to move on; find a company where your upward mobility will be less hindered. If not, perhaps you aren’t working hard enough or directing your efforts in the most efficient direction. In either case, an unexpected rejection at work is probably a signal something needs to change.

Author: Jenny Beswick was made redundant last year but this year she managed to find a new job on the Legal Week Jobs Board and has now been promoted. If you are looking for a new boss in a new industry then keep an eye on the job board today!

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‘Should I stay or should I go?’

The Stats

The Office for National Statistics reported that 382,000 people resigned from their jobs in 2011. This figure has been falling ever since the late 1990’s. Recent trends suggest that workers are still affected by the recession – a stagnating job market means that a change in career is not exactly easy. Others see opportunity but are fearful to make the move; the concept of ‘First in, last out’ in relation to redundancy practice is still often used, despite increasing difficulties for the employer in justifying this approach.

Is The Grass Greener?

Nevertheless, many employees consider a job change or career move – motivated these days by the notion of that the ‘grass is greener on the other side’. Therefore, the employee with itchy feet needs to carefully consider certain factors when contemplating a resignation. The decision to resign may come following a bad day or week at work, and therefore be made in the heat of the moment. Employees feeling the pinch are recommended to take a day or two to consider how they really feel.

Consider The Wider Implications

When it comes to career decisions, there is no shame in acting with a little selfishness; after all, a career is a personal thing. Having said that, employees considering a career change or resignation should take some time to carefully and dispassionately consider who would be affected by their actions. In many cases this will be family and friends; these people are likely to be seriously affected by a career change – both in financial and social terms. For some, these will be a stronger influencing factor than for others.
Workers should consider their colleagues and managers too. Specifically, this would be in taking a step back and looking at where one’s current job is going – rather than where it is at the moment. For example, if the reason for leaving is a personality conflict with co-workers or a boss; is the other party looking to leave as well? If so, is it better for the worker to stay put if other aspects of the job are fine? This works the other way round too; a real superstar of a manager may be able to work some magic to make an otherwise stressful working environment a little more bearable.

Other Reasons

The other reason to step back and reflect before reacting is to consider what to do next; more and more people are choosing to explore totally new career paths (recessions seem to compel people to take stock of their priorities). Taking time to consider options will ensure that there is a plan – method behind motivation.
Despite the gloominess of the current job market, people are still making the brave choice to move on to new things. Taking time to reflect on the above will ensure that if someone’s ultimate decision is still to leave, then that choice is communicated with reason and diplomacy in the resignation letter. After all, it’s vital to never burn bridges; who knows what – or who – the future holds.

This post was written with the collaboration with Badenoch and Clark, helping you find the job you are looking for.

 

 

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3 People You Should be Networking With

It’s all about networking. Most people find jobs through the people they know, or the connections they have made through formal networking opportunities. Networking is the process of forming and fostering relationships with people in specific industries. People network with all kinds of professionals, and the more they do it the more successful they will be in their career.

But who do you network with? At every turn you are advised to network but you aren’t given many specific tips on who to network with. Here are three types of people you should start networking with as soon as possible.

Your Peers

You may not think of your classmates and current coworkers as valuable connections; but they are. These people will one day be peers in your industry, and may have the power to help you find a job. Your peers are also doing internships and searching for jobs too, so they can be a great resource when it comes to job interview questions and leads. You can start connecting with your peers by taking your friendship a step up from where it is. Start talking to your peers about jobs, internships and industry experience and before you know it they will turn into valuable professional contacts.

Professionals in Your Area

Networking does take work. You should be networking with industry professionals in your area, but that can be hard to do. Start by attending networking events and applying for internships. You can also take networking to a more informal level by reaching out to professionals through common connections. You may have peers who know professionals you don’t know, and can therefore introduce you to them.

Your Professors

Look at your professors as industry experts. These people are highly knowledgeable, experienced and qualified and you are lucky to be able to brush shoulders with them. Take advantage of your education by becoming aquatinted with your professors. Don’t suck up to your teachers, but get to know their backgrounds and their areas of specialty. Some good ways to do this are to stop by their offices to get help on an assignments, ask questions about job searching or even ask them to take a look at your resume.

Networking may be the best thing you can do for your job search and eventually your career. As you get to know your peers, professionals and your professors, your circle of connections will widen. The more people you know, the more resources you will have as you look for a job after you graduate from college.

Jill Hardy writes for a website called UniversitiesOnline.net, a site that helps students prepare for their future careers by getting the education and training they need.

 

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Know Your Rights! How Employers Can And CAN NOT Use Your History Against You

If you pay any attention to national news, all you hear is: no jobs, economy bad, market struggling, jobs hard to find, double dip recession, down market, and did we mention no jobs? As an out of work labor force grows increasingly desperate, companies are being flooded with resumes and, therefore; hiring managers have the luxury of being quite choosy.

In order to thin the alarmingly huge herd of applicants, many companies are requiring prospective employees to submit to a criminal background check. These kinds of checks scour a person’s past and inform your future employer of any criminal activity associated with you, even stuff you’ve only been accused of can show up! It is important to understand what your individual rights are, so you don’t get unlawfully eliminated from your dream job.

What is and is NOT Legal
Even if you are one of the few Americans with a record clean enough to eat off of, chances are, you will still have to get a background check. If you plan on working in any kind of government job, expect to take one. Criminal checks for government positions are usually more extensive and involve livescan fingerprinting (which the applicant has to foot the bill for), so expect everything to come up. Other jobs in which you work with children, or the elderly will also ask their candidates to get checked out. Expect for them to look up your social media profiles as well, so watch how vulgar you get with your status updates while job hunting.

The specifics of the report will vary based on where you live, and the job you are applying for. Don’t worry though, there are some things from your past which won’t be visible in a criminal check. You can still maintain your innocent facade if any of these apply to you:

  • Bankruptcy that occurred more than 10 years ago
  • Civil suits and tax liens also vanish after 7 years
  • Anything from years prior that did not result in a criminal conviction

Basically if you had sketchy financial issues, but they happened a long time ago, you don’t need to worry. However, notice on the last bullet point that anything negative from years prior will not show up. This means that if you were arrested last week but were found innocent, that arrest will still show up on a criminal check. Bummer.

Along Came The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Slightly sketchy job seekers can rejoice. The EEOC recently revised their stance on criminal checks so that it was a little more clear about what was acceptable and what was not. They wanted to make sure that an employer knows that they cannot simply deny someone a position that has a criminal background. The conviction has to cause a threat to the company that is consistent with the specific details of the job. OK, so those guidelines are somewhat subjective but at least it’s a step towards transparency when it comes to the role of background checks in the hiring process. The two big things that came out of the recent EEOC decision are: 1) Employers must know the difference between a conviction and arrest. You are innocent until proven guilty. Hello, this is America! 2) Employers CAN NOT disqualify someone just because he or she has a record.

What these two facts mean to you: If you were arrested for something that did not lead to a conviction but were you denied a position based on the results of a background check, that is illegal. AND even if you were convicted, unless the nature of your crime directly corresponds to the job duties (like a delivery driver having a DUI) you can’t be turned away. If you are, that is also illegal.

What Does This Mean?
If you don’t have a record and aren’t looking for a job, then this does not affect you at all. You are now free to go about your day. But, if you are like millions of other Americans with a less than perfect past, this could mean being able to earn an honest living by actually getting hired.

The decision by the EEOC will also help combat racial profiling. Since white, wealthy folks generally fare better in the criminal justice system, African Americans and Latinos have a higher arrest and conviction rate (this does NOT mean they commit more crimes than white people). Now that a conviction is no longer grounds for disqualification, this law could go a long way to help these communities combat record levels of unemployment. Certainly this can be seen as a step in the right direction.

If for some reason you feel that you have been wrongly denied a job then you can contact the EEOC and they will let you know what your next steps will be.

Kristen Bright is the social media consultant for Instant CheckmateInstant Checkmate is a personal criminal background check provider, and does not perform employment screening of any kind.

 

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The Benefits of a VIDEO Job Board for Search

When searching for a candidate, companies generally use one of two venues, either a recruiter or a job board.

The Recruiter

If the Employer is looking for a specialized individual in a specific field or if he doesn’t have the time, the Employer will probably use a recruiter. However, his pockets better be deep, as recruiters will charge anywhere from 15% to 30% of the candidate’s gross annual income. The percentage that the recruiter charges depends on each individual recruiter’s fee schedule.

The Job Board

If the Employer has the time to search for the candidate himself and wants to keep the cost of the search low, then the Employer will use a job board and perform the search himself. The costs of posting a job(s) and/or searching resumes vary from job board to job board, but these costs are without a doubt much more economical than the use of recruiters.

The VIDEO Job Board   This is a link to an actual candidate, and his video!

Ideally, the best solution in finding a candidate would be a job board that didn’t cost anything for either Employers or Candidates. Even better still would be a ‘no cost’ job board with Videos where the Employer could see the personality, presence, and qualities of each individual needed for a specific career requirement, something that paper resumes alone can’t do. This ideal solution is “CareerFlick”.

“CareerFlick” is a Worldwide Video Resume Jobsite that is FREE for all Employers and all Job Seekers.  This Job Board/Jobsite lets Employers post ‘unlimited’ jobs and view ‘unlimited’ Video Resumes of Job Seekers for FREE with NO time constraints and NO recruiting fees. Job Seekers can upload their own Video Resume or have a staff member of CareerFlick help them create it for FREE. Like Kijiji and Facebook, CareerFlick earns its revenue from advertisers.

Video Resumes are a thing of the future, but are here now. The use of Video Resumes is a valuable time-saving asset for BOTH Job Seekers and Employers by allowing Employers the opportunity of pre-screening candidates. Video Resumes help Employers see the “real” candidates in order to effectively select the very best candidates for a more extensive and formal ‘in-person’ interview. In short, Video Resumes save time and money for BOTH Employers and Job Seekers.

The Choice

In summary, if the Employer wants to save HIS time and can afford it, he should use a recruiter. If the Employer wants to save ‘time’ AND ‘money’, he should use a job board/job site, ideally one that is FREE and has Videos, such as “CareerFlick”.


 

 

“CareerFlick” IS A WORLDWIDE VIDEO RESUME JOBSITE THAT IS FREE FOR ALL EMPLOYERS & ALL JOB SEEKERS.

“CareerFlick” lets Employers post ‘UNLIMITED’ jobs and view ‘UNLIMITED’ VIDEO RESUMES of Job Seekers for FREE with NO time constraints and NO recruiting fees…totally FREE!

“CareerFlick” has Job Seekers from all around the World and EVERY Job Seeker has a personal VIDEO RESUME. Job Seekers can upload their own VIDEO RESUME or have us help them create it for FREE!

 

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