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Tag Archives: Mental Health

Would Your Holidays be Different If You Knew You Had a Terminal Illness?


Woman Living with Incurable Cancer Offers 3 Ways to Get
the Most Out of Every Day

herrman

Jane Schwartzberg cringes when she hears someone say that a terrible accident or frightening medical diagnosis made them realize what’s important in life.

“In some ways, I do wish everyone could experience a taste of terminal, if that’s what it takes to make them appreciate the intangible gifts we receive not just during the holidays, but all year,” says Schwartzberg, co-author with Marcy Tolkoff Levy of “Naked Jane Bares All,” www.nakedjanebaresall.com, a new book that shares Jane’s story with candor and humor.

“But I wish they’d known all along, and I hate the thought of goodness coming at the expense of so much suffering.”

Schwartzberg says she was clear about what’s most important before she was diagnosed with stage four incurable breast cancer. As a mother, wife, daughter, sister, aunt and friend, she knew that all that really matters is how much love we give and receive.
The holidays are a wonderful opportunity for people to remember that and to focus on who they love. But, too often, they become a source of anxiety, stress, and tension. Financial concerns, having too much to do, and missing loved ones were among the top causes of holiday stress, according to a recent Mental Health America survey.

“Although I won’t attribute any revelations about what’s most important in life to my illness, I can say that there are a few things that I am trying to do better since getting sick,” Schwartzberg says.

“The holidays are a great time to cultivate a spirit of gratitude and to re-focus on the things that are most meaningful.”

For Schwartzberg, those include:

• Showing up. If you’re worried about yesterday or always planning for tomorrow, you’re missing the present moment and any wonderful experiences it may hold.

“Although my clock ticks louder than others, I know we are all here for a short time,” Schwartzberg says. “I am determined to find joy in every single day. It may come from the simplest of things: a view from my window, a great conversation or a hot cup of coffee. But I know I need to be always present and available, with an open mind and open heart, to experience any of it.”

• Riding her love train. We all have people in our lives who care about us, and it’s important to let them know how much we appreciate them. Schwartzberg’s “love train” is a metaphor for all of the people she chooses to share her life with.  “They are rooting me on and giving my family and me love and support,” she says. “I try to be as meticulous and thoughtful as I possibly can be with those on board, and that means making sure they know how much I love and value them.”

• Knowing my place in the world. There is a Jewish teaching that says everyone should carry with them two pieces of paper, each in a separate pocket. One paper should say, “I am but dust and ashes.”  The other, “The world was created for me.”

“I constantly remind myself that both statements are true,” Schwartzberg says. “I am capable of incredible things to improve the world, and I am just a tiny speck in the universe. Powerfulness and humility can, and do, exist for me side by side.”

As the holidays approach, keep in mind that the best gift you can give – or receive – is love.

“It’s not a table full of food or gadgets you can’t afford,” she says. “Approach this holiday season as if it could be your last, and you’ll probably find much more to revel in than to stress about.”

About Jane Schwartzberg

Jane Schwartzberg, 45, is the co-author of the newly released book, “Naked Jane Bares All,” the many-layered story – told with humor and candor — of how she learned to embrace life when she was down for the count. Jane is a financial services executive and founder and former CEO of a start-up technology company.

 

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Five Tips To Overcome Top Executive Burnouts

Even though people use stress and burnout as synonyms, these words refer to different aspects: stress implies a physical state where your body is overly taxed, whereas a burnout defines a state of depression that is mostly caused by an overwhelming feeling of powerlessness. Nonetheless, stress is known to be one of the leading causes of several conditions, including work burnout. Given the current frantic economic fluctuations and intense competition, it is safe to assume that almost all managers are under a lot of stress and therefore more likely to experience burnout. Because both will affect an executive manager’s capacity to run an organization effectively, it is important to take action immediately; following is a list of 5 tips on how to deal with work-related burnouts.

Work Life Balance Graphic1. Make realistic to-do lists
As the CEO, it’s very likely that you have an interminable to-do list that gets bigger and bigger each day. Without denying that those tasks have to get done, they don’t have to be done all at once, but rather gradually, particularly if you don’t have the physical time to finish them all. Since the mere sight of an endless list could add to the stress load, it is recommended to start making smaller and more manageable lists.

2. Take some time for yourself
If you are unable to remember the last time you took your family out to dinner or the last time you spent some quality time with your spouse, then you are experiencing burnout. While you are an indispensable man for your company, don’t forget that those countless sleepless nights and stress could have already taken their toll on the other important aspects of your life. The solution is to take some time off and meet with the people you love on a regular basis. However, make sure you are truly “away” from work by leaving your laptop and phone at the office.

3. Reevaluate the deadlines
Although you are under a lot of pressure to reach deadlines, it is never a good idea to overpromise on the delivery date. Not only will you and your team be under a lot of stress, but the final product could also be subpar to the company’s standards. An effective approach in this case is to allow for some leeway time, so the consequences are not so tragic if you don’t meet deadlines.

4. Make sure you have sufficient resources to get the job done
Closely related to successfully meeting deadlines, incorrectly estimating the resources you need to get the project done constitutes another source of burnout. Despite the fact that some projects are urgent, dedicate some time to evaluate exactly what you need and even get additional resources before you get started. On a side note, it’s a good idea to consult with your staff when establishing the required resources for a project.

5. Understand that sometimes you need to say “no”
While most managers can’t even imagine turning down a project, it is important to note that if you don’t have the time and resources for it then it is OK to refuse that task. In addition, you can also decline going to meetings that don’t really concern you or say “no” to your boss or colleague if they come in unannounced and interrupt you constantly when you are busy. As an executive, CEO or other professional remember you’re the boss!

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Lucy Smith is currently learning to manage stress in the workplace. She chooses running to help manage her stress and improve her health and wellbeing. Lucy can’t wait to run her 8th marathon this year!

 

 

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Transitioning from CEO to Retiree: Why You Need a 5-Year Plan

retirement13 Steps You Can Take Now to Realize Your Goals

Today’s 50-something CEOs tend to have vague dreams of  more fishing, traveling or sailing  when they retire, but they don’t know when that might be so they haven’t begun planning for it.

That’s a mistake, say a trio of specialists: wealth management advisor Haitham “Hutch” Ashoo, CPA Jim Kohles, and estate planning attorney John Hartog.

“Whether you’re selling your company, passing it along to a successor or simply retiring, that’s a potentially irreversible life event – you’ve got just one chance to get it right,” says Ashoo, CEO of Pillar Wealth Management, (www.pillarwm.com).

A 2012 survey of CEOs by executive search firm Witt/Kieffer found 71 percent of those aged 55 to 59 have no retirement plan, although 73 percent look forward to more recreational and leisure activities when they let go of the reins.

“A lot of baby boomers have the idea that they’re just going to work till they stop working,” says Kohles, chairman of RINA accountancy corporation, (www.rina.com). “If they hope to do certain things in retirement and maintain a certain lifestyle, they’re likely to end up disappointed.”

Planning for the transition from CEO to retiree should incorporate everything – including what happens to your assets after you’re gone, adds John Hartog of Hartog & Baer Trust and Estate Law, (www.hartogbaer.com).

“Many of my clients worry about what effects a large inheritance will have on their children – they want to continue parenting from the grave. You can, but should think hard about doing that,” he says.

The three say smart planning requires coordinating among all of your advisors; that’s the best way to avoid an irrevocable mistake. With that in mind, Ashoo, Kohles and Hartog offer these suggestions and considerations from their respective areas of expertise:

1. Ashoo: Identify your specific lifestyle goals for retirement, so you can plan for funding them. To determine how much money you’ll need, you have to have a clear picture of what you want, Ashoo says. Do you see yourself on your own yacht? Providing seed capital for your children to buy a business? Pursuing charitable endeavors?

Each goal will have a dollar amount attached, and you (or your advisor) can then determine whether it’s feasible and, if so, put together a financial plan.

“But you can’t just create a plan and forget it. You need to monitor its progress regularly and make adjustments to make sure you’re staying on course, just like you would if you were sailing or flying,” Ashoo says. “We run our clients’ plans quarterly.“

It’s also imperative that you don’t take any undue risks – that is, risks beyond what’s necessary to meet your goals, he says. “You may hear about a great investment opportunity and want in on it, but if you lose that money, you may not have a chance to make it up.”

2. Kohles: Don’t sell yourself short when selling your business. “If you’re banking on money from the sale of your business, know that it’s unlikely you’ll have investors just waiting with the cash for the chance to buy it when you’re ready to sell,” Kohles says.

Buyers are more likely to offer to pay over time from the company’s future earnings — which leaves the retired CEO with no control over the business and utterly reliant on the new owners to maintain its profitability.

A good alternative is to establish an S corporation combined with an employee stock ownership plan (ESOP), Kohles says.

“You’re selling the company to the employees while retaining control until you phase yourself completely out,” he says. “The ESOP doesn’t pay income taxes – the employees do when they retire. And you don’t pay taxes on the money or the stock that you contribute.”

3. Hartog: What do you want your kids’ inheritance to say? If you have children, this decision can change their lives for the better – or the worse.

“How your assets are disposed of should reflect your values,” Hartog says. “A lot of people prefer to think in terms of taxes at the expense of values. I advise against that.”

For children, incentive trusts can encourage, or discourage, certain behaviors.

“If you’re concerned your adult child won’t be productive if he has a lot of money, set up a trust that will make distributions equal to what the child earns himself,” Hartog says.

“Or, if you want to be supportive of a child who’s doing something socially responsible, like teaching in an impoverished area, you can set it up to pay twice his salary.”

There are many creative ways to establish trusts, Hartog says. Plan about five years out and change the trust as life events dictate.

About Haitham “Hutch” Ashoo

Haitham “Hutch” Ashoo is the CEO of Pillar Wealth Management, LLC, in Walnut Creek, Calif. The firm specializes in client-centered wealth management for ultra affluent families.

About Jim Kohles

Jim Kohles is chairman of the board of RINA accountancy corporation, Walnut Creek, Calif. A certified public accountant for more than 35 years, he specializes in business consulting, succession and retirement planning, and insurance.

About John Hartog

John Hartog is a partner at Hartog & Baer Trust and Estate Law. A certified specialist in estate planning, trust and probate law, and taxation law, he has been selected to the Super Lawyers Top 100 list for nineconsecutive years.

 

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Why Big Leaders need to have Small Egos

christLeaders are very important to the success of a business, as they are the ones who inspire others, drive movement forward and provide the company with a goal. However, a leader with a larger than life ego can actually be a detriment to a company, holding it back and causing problems rather than encouraging success.

There is a huge difference between ego and confidence. Self-confidence is an essential trait in a strong leader as they need to be able to believe in themselves and confidently stride towards their dreams. Rather than the calm self-assuredness that confidence brings, a big ego manifests itself in pride, boastfulness, self-centeredness and an inability to admit when one is wrong.

Here are a few reasons why having a big ego is not a very good trait in a successful leader.

Leaders Need to Be Able to Admit When they are Wrong

Even though they might be put in charge because they have the most education or experience, leaders are not always right. In fact, sometimes they can make big mistakes, totally misjudge situations or get things completely wrong. This is nothing to be ashamed about, after all everyone is human and will make a mistake once in a while.

However, sometimes big leaders are afraid to admit that they have got it wrong. They are so unwilling to show any weaknesses that they will follow through with things even though all signs are indicating that they have got it wrong. They will lead their company towards disaster while pretending that they are doing the right thing, rather than admitting their blunder and asking for help.

A good leader should never let their own ego get in the way of realising when they are making a mistake. A confident leader is never afraid of confessing to a mistake and taking a new approach and if this is done with grace it will make your employees respect you even more.

Leaders Need to Be Able To Let the Achievements of Others Shine

Another trait of someone with a big ego is that they are quick to snap up all the credit when it comes to the group’s accomplishments. You’ve probably seen it before, the team leader whose team puts in plenty of effort to achieve something and then when it comes time to receive accolades, he speaks like he did all of the work himself. These are also the types of people who are likely to choose team members who are less competent than themselves because their primary motivation is making themselves look good. In the thinking of an egotistical person, another person’s success means that they have failed so they will feel better about themselves when others achieve and earn less.

A great leader needs to be able to step out of the spotlight and be gratified by the achievements of others. They must realise that they cannot accomplish or control everything, so they need to invest in fantastic team members and value their contribution to the organisation. Good leaders will know how to let another employee shine.

Leaders Need to Be Able to Unite Rather Than Divide

One of the most important roles of a leader is to be able to make each and every person working with them feel like they are valued and appreciated. They need to create a positive and optimistic working environment which makes employees feel engaged and motivated.

Unfortunately, a leader with a big ego will be too focused on themselves to make this happen. The people working with them will become increasingly fed up with their egotistical behaviour and will not be inspired to do their best. They might even cause conflict in the workplace, which further distracts people from doing a good job at work.

Instead of a big leader with an even bigger ego, it is better to have someone who does not deny reality even when it is negative and is able to admit their own mistakes. They will be able to help people get through difficult times, let the achievements of others shine and encourage everyone that they work with to put their best performance in.  You will be amazed at the different that a calm and confident leader without a big ego can make on your organisation.

Having a big ego can really get in the way of providing excellent leadership and here are some of the reasons why. To find out more about our leadership programs, visit Cirrus today.

 

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14 Tips to Overcome Jealousy from Your Best Friend

Jealousy is a human vice that tends to creep into any and every relationship. It usually stems out of a feeling of inferiority from a particular person. However, if you feel jealous of your best friend, you should either check your approach to your friend’s words and actions or get a new best friend because jealousy cannot exist where love and friendship does. However, for some reason, if you do feel a rivalry or constant need to compare yourself with your best friend, you are not alone and this issue can be nipped in the bud. Here are a few tips to overcome jealousy from your best friend:

Recognize that you are jealous:

The first and foremost step in solving a problem is to recognize that the problem exists. Unless you can accept that you are harbouring feelings of jealousy against your best friend, nothing can help you to overcome it. Crazy as it may sound, if you keep comparing yourself to your best friend and if you constantly wish to be in his/her shoes, you are jealous of him/her.

Stop comparing yourself with him/her:

Once you have identified the problem, you need to start thinking about a plan of action to overcome this envious feeling. Don’t allow the green-eyed little monster inside you to get the better of you. If you keep comparing yourself and your assets with him/her, stop doing that immediately because it’s not going to get you anywhere. It is not going to be easy but just stay strong and divert your mind into other activities whenever you feel jealous.

Be content with what you have:

Learn to be satisfied with your life irrespective of what you have. There are people in this planet who would give anything to be in your shoes so don’t feel bad about yourself. If your best friend has something that you don’t, learn to appreciate it.

Admire your individuality:

Tell yourself that you are special and just as good as the next person. Feel comfortable with yourself and recognize all the good attributes and talent that you have. Instead of wasting time on envious feelings, discover your own individual characteristics. Unless you learn to appreciate your qualities, nobody else will.

Think about things you are better at:

Whenever your mind wanders into forbidden territory and you cannot help but compare yourself with her, instead of asking yourself “How can she sing so well?”, and turning green in envy, think about the things that you are better at. Everyone has something special in them and your special attribute is probably just waiting to be discovered.

Try to compliment her sincerely:

Even though this can be difficult with all the jealousy raging within you, try to be sincere when you compliment her for something. Don’t keep any feelings of ill-will when you say anything nice to her because that will make you a fake friend instead of a jealous friend.

Give it your best shot and leave no regrets:

Your best friend might be better at you than dancing or in academics but it honestly doesn’t matter as long as you have given it the best you could. If you actually concentrate on giving it your best shot instead of wasting time thinking about your best friend and distracting yourself, you might just prove to be better than him/her.

Try to talk to him/her:

If you share a very close and comfortable relationship with him/her, you can also consider talking about your feelings and do something about it together. Sharing your feelings can give the much needed outlet for your negative thoughts.

He/she is your best friend so think about their positive attributes:

Even though you are envious of him/her right now, you chose your him/her as your best friend so there has to be some positive attribute in them that you admire. Think about the qualities that brought your best friend so close to you and appreciate the good in them. Harbouring jealousy is not going to get you where your friend is but it is going to ruin your friendship with him/her sooner or later.

Be accepting and open minded:

Have a heart and accept things for what they are. Being envious of your best friend’s achievements isn’t going to get you there. He/she doesn’t have super powers. If they have achieved something, it is because of their hard work, diligence and will power and if you exhibit these qualities, you can be there too.

Is your jealousy going to help you? Think about it:

Ask this question to yourself and you will get the answer to all your questions. This is a little trick I play with myself whenever I feel anything negative towards someone and it works wonders for self-realization.

Your jealousy might be signalling something deeper:

You might be jealous on a very superficial level. If you think about it, perhaps in your sub-conscious mind, this jealousy might not be person specific at all. There can be many reasons for someone to feel jealous apart from the most obvious one of wanting to be in their shoes so if you feel jealous of others frequently, consider going to therapy.

Think about the difficulties she has dealt with or deals with on an everyday basis:

If you cannot see your qualities or just appreciate what they have without wanting to have that too, try thinking about the problems that they have dealt with in the past or are dealing with right now. Try to empathize with their situation and feel happy for their achievements.

Talk to someone about this problem:

If all else fails, talk to someone about your jealousy. It can be a parent, a friend, your sibling or even the school/college counsellor. Neither should such feelings be encouraged, nor should they be kept bottled up inside you. Get some help before it’s too late.

This post is written by Jason Gilbert who has been working with Corebloggers as a resident writer. He loves writing about career, personal development, etc. His recently published post was how to deal with loneliness.

 

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Cultivating Compassion by Gil Fronsdal

Compassion is inextricably linked to the Buddhist practice of liberation. It can be the motivation for this practice as well as the result.  As one’s inner freedom grows, one’s capacity for compassion increases; as one’s compassion increases, so does the importance of freedom. Liberation supports compassion and compassion supports liberation. They both benefit when they go hand in hand.

Compassion is a form of empathy and care that wishes for the alleviation of someone’s suffering. Known as karuna in Buddhism, this compassion is sometimes referred to as the “jewel in the lotus.” The lotus symbolizes the heart or mind that, with practice, blossoms into freedom, and the jewel represents the compassion appearing in the center of this blossom. The feeling of unfettered compassion is one of the most beautiful feelings a person can experience, providing valuable meaning and purpose to any human life.  Its presence is sometimes celebrated in Buddhism as an inner wealth and source of happiness.

Given its importance, Buddhism doesn’t leave the manifestation of compassion to chance. We don’t have to passively accept how often and how strongly we happen to experience it. Instead, it’s possible to actively develop our feelings of compassion and remove the obstacles for our feeling compassionate.

Because people sometimes confuse compassion with feelings of distress, it is helpful to clearly distinguish these two. Compassion doesn’t make us victims of suffering, whereas feeling distress on another’s behalf often does.  Learning how to see the suffering in the world without taking it on personally is very important; when we take it personally it is easy to become depressed or burdened.  We can avoid taking it as a personal burden or obligation if we learn to feel empathy without it touching our own fears, attachments, and perhaps unresolved grief.

This means that to feel greater compassion for others we need to understand our own suffering. Mindfulness practice is a great help in this.  With mindfulness, we can better see our suffering, its roots within us and the way to freedom from suffering; we can begin to cultivate both equanimity toward our suffering and release from its causes.

In this regard, it’s helpful to appreciate the great value in staying present, open, and mindful of suffering, both our own and that of others. We often need to give ourselves time to process difficult events and experiences and to let difficult emotions move through us.  When immediate action is not required, staying mindful of suffering doesn’t necessarily require a lot of wisdom or special techniques. It mostly takes patience and perseverance.  Relaxed mindfulness of our own suffering increases our ability to feel empathy for others’ difficulty and pain. It gives time for understanding and letting go to occur.  By practicing to be free of habitual reactivity, we take the time to see and feel more deeply what is happening.  This allows empathy to operate and for deeper responses to arise from within.  In this way, compassion is evoked rather than intentionally created.

Some people are reluctant to actively cultivate compassion because they worry that it will be insincerely or artificially contrived. Others fear that it will make them sentimentally naive or prevent them from seeing others clearly or realistically—perhaps out of concern they will be taken advantage of if they are compassionate to others.  Because efforts to be compassionate can be misguided, these concerns are worth keeping in mind.  However, as there are healthy ways to increase our compassion, the concerns don’t have to inhibit our efforts to do so.

One effective way of developing compassion is creating conditions that make it more likely to occur. That is, rather than directly making ourselves more compassionate, we can engage in activities that make it more likely to appear naturally.

A condition for compassion is a sense of safety.  It is easier to feel compassionate if we feel safe and very difficult when we don’t.  Therefore, to develop a confident and compassionate life, it can be helpful to find appropriate ways to feel safe.  Locking ourselves in our home may feel secure, but it’s not conducive to caring more about others. Learning how to be safe while in the world is more useful.  So is using mindfulness practice to address some of the anxieties and self-preoccupations that make us more likely to feel threatened.

It is important not to feel obligated to be compassionate as this often leads to self-criticism and stress that interferes with the arising of a natural compassion. Buddhism doesn’t require us to feel empathy and care for others. It does say, however, that we have the capacity to be compassionate and that doing so is a wonderful asset to ourselves, to others, and to the practice of freedom. The focus can be on how compassion enriches us, not depletes us.

Some people are hesitant to cultivate compassion because they worry they will have to give up too much of themselves as they help others.  Or they fear they will have to spend time with people they feel uncomfortable with. By knowing we are not obligated to be compassionate it may be easier for us to use our best wisdom and common sense to understand when acting on compassion is appropriate and when it is not.

Having confidence in our skill to respond to others’ suffering can also make it easier to feel compassion.  If we feel helpless, too uncomfortable, or even threatened by the troubles others are facing, awareness of their suffering may add to a sense of personal threat.  Developing skill has a lot to do with slow and patient training in such things as mindfulness, concentration, and letting go.

A way of strengthening compassion is to understand and then release what prevents it from arising.  For example, tension and stress limit compassion. When we’re stressed, we’re usually too preoccupied for empathy to operate. However, when we’re relaxed, our capacity for empathy increases. People who cultivate deep states of calm often find it naturally opens their hearts to great capacities of compassion and love.

Selfishness and self-preoccupation also obstruct compassion by blocking the attention and sensitivity that is needed for compassion to arise.  One benefit of letting go of selfishness is that compassion arises more easily.

We can also increase the amount of compassion we feel in our lives by setting the intention to do so. This can be quite specific, such as intending to be compassionate in a particular situation or toward a particular person—or it can be more general, as intending to be compassionate for this day or this week. When we consciously set this intention, we’re more likely to be reminded of and to think in terms of compassion. We will also notice compassionate thoughts and impulses that occur but which may otherwise be overshadowed by different desires and concerns.

Valuing compassion when it does appear can also strengthen it and make it more apt to arise in the future. We might consider and appreciate the benefits it can bring others as well as ourselves. Knowing the benefits can bring a sense happiness that in turn can make compassion more appealing.  Compassion can be more appealing when we have seen how it can be a source of happiness and how it can be intimately connected with our inner freedom.  Compassion for others can be a relief when we have spent too long pre-occupied with ourselves.

Another supportive condition is to deliberately reflect on compassion, perhaps stimulated by regularly reading and talking to others about it.  Whatever we think about regularly can become an inclination.  If we repeatedly think about love, kindness and caring for others, thoughts related to compassion are likely to appear more often.

Spending time with people who are compassionate can also help us.  The people we see frequently often have an influence on us. Seeing compassion in others can inspire it in ourselves.

Finally, understanding how compassion is a form of love helps us recognize what a jewel it truly is. When it arises from inner freedom it is then connected to other beautiful capacities of our hearts. It can appear together with well-being, calm, clarity, and peace.

There is, in fact, a great deal we can do to make compassion a more central part of our lives. As compassion grows, our self-centeredness and clinging decrease, and liberation becomes easier. As we become freer, compassion becomes more readily available.  To let compassion and liberation support each other is one of the most beautiful ways of training in the Buddhist path.  It can be our gift to the world.

—Gil Fronsdal

 

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Step Up To The Slight Edge

The Slight Edge by Jeff Olson is all about altering your lifestyle. Folks implement “the slight edge” daily whilst not actually realizing it. Basic, daily judgments make up the slight edge. With time, tiny, daily judgments will yield huge outcomes. The outcomes created may either result in positive or negative repercussions, dependent upon the judgments which were made.

This specific publication assists individuals to accomplish their set goals. It’s about getting positive thinking into practice, making much more successful judgments, and also remaining consistent. Usually, achievements along with overall satisfaction won’t take place instantly. To be able to achieve your sought after goal or ideal, tenacity needs to be a part of the picture. By way of example, let’s assume that you need to shed something like 20 pounds; you already know this is simply not something you are able to in a single day. All your other desired goals are actually identical. Regardless of whether your main goal is to begin thinking more favorably, it probably will not be permanently accomplished in just a few hours.

Determination calls for patience, and while practicing patience and determination, you need to stay enthusiastic, or else, you are going to quit. The Slight Edge offers the inspiration necessary to keep moving ahead with all your ambitions.

A lot of people set up goals, and also have hopes for moving ahead with them, yet hardly ever try to make an effort to accomplish this. Jeff Olson highlights that whatever you undertake starts off with a thought and so brings about action. A lot of people only spend their days wondering about what they desire. All that a person needs within their lives (besides money and achievement) happen to be there when needed. You may want to create better associations with your pals, co-workers, and also husband or wife. You may want to captivate that person you have had your eye on for so very long.

The universe will align the elements, making the most perfect setting in which your own wishes can be easily procured providing you are taking basic steps each day to color the image you desire. The actual Slight Edge Philosophy can be employed by anyone. Take into account your own teeth. In the event you choose to not clean them today, it almost certainly is not going to make any difference. Nonetheless, if you decide to not clean them daily for the following two or three years, you are likely to see that you are having a few serious issues. That’s one more illustration showing exactly what the Slight Edge is centered on.

This book is made to help alter the manner in which you think – and not using a difficult approach like the majority of other self-help publications. There is not any “huge breakthrough” and no unrealistic claims – only straightforward common sense. The strategies presented within this book are generally discussed in such a way which will make putting them into practice instantly one of the simplest things any person is ever going to do.

Come To The Personal Development Company To Learn More About The Slight Edge Audiobook by Jeff Olson

 

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Go For No by Richard Fenton and Andrea Waltz

Have you ever met someone who actually liked the word, “No”? Probably not. “No” is associated with the inability to do something. I makes people feel inadequate, rejected, and as if they are being held back from what is they want. “No” leads to frustration, anger, and anxiety. Unfortunately, it is most people’s perception of the word, “No” that have gotten them into so much trouble.

If you really want to get negative, look at the word, “No” in a negative light. Doing so will only lead you down a darker path in your career. You’ll wake up each day with less and less enthusiasm about your career. However, there is a truth to this word that people are missing out on. The truth is that “No” is actually a positive word, but only if viewed in a positive light.

It is in a salesman‘s best interest to react to “No” in the same fashion as a teenage child. When a teenager or child is told “No”, they look at it as a challenge and act out in rebellion. The thing that a parent tells their child they cannot do is the very thing that they end up doing. As you can see, it is a human’s “natural” reaction to rebel rather than to take the word so seriously.

For true success, you should allow this seemingly-negative word to motivate you. When you are faced with someone who is turning away your products, understand that they are not necessarily turning your products away, but simply being negative. The power to change the entire situation ultimately lies within you hands.

So, the next time someone tells you know, what do you do? Accept it and walk away or try to convince them? Obviously, you change the way you perceive the word. As soon as you put out the vibe that you have been rejected, your prospect is going to be empowered and therefore convinced that they did the right thing. The last thing you want to do is allow the situation to escalate to this point.

Understand that nine times out of ten, you are going to be denied anyway. So, be prepared. Envision that you prospect has already said no. Instead of allowing “No” signify the end of the sale, look over it and ignore it. If it makes you angry, let it make you angry. Just know that you are the only one who has the power to transform the way this word makes you feel.

Becoming a successful sales individual is a matter of choice. Everyone knows that before they get involved into the career of sales that they are going to experience rejection. Some of the most successful millionaires have had to experience rejection, and still do to this day.

The thing that sets you apart from becoming the next sales billionaire is how you choose to handle the situation. Ultimately, this is going to require a bit of reorganization on your behalf. You must take time reorganizing your thoughts. Instead of expecting the worst, getting upset, disappointed and then discouraged, turn it all around. Feel the rejection, understand that it isn’t pleasant, then decide that you will not let it get the best of you.

Use the word, “No” as a means to a beginning of a lifetime of success and resilience. After you feel the initial impact of being knocked down, get up, regroup, and try again, but only with a more positive approach. More importantly, do away with the fear of the word and turn it into a motivation.

Please visit The Personal Development Company if you would like to learn more about Go For No! principles by Richard Fenton and Andrea Waltz

 

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